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Density cycles and an offspring quantity and quality game driven by natural selection

Sinervo, B; Svensson, Erik LU and Comendant, T (2000) In Nature 406(6799). p.985-988
Abstract
A long-standing hypothesis posits that natural selection can favour two female strategies when density cycles. At low density, females producing many smaller progeny are favoured when the intrinsic rate of increase, r, governs population growth. At peak density, females producing fewer, high-quality, progeny are favoured when the carrying capacity, K, is exceeded and the population crashes. Here we report on the first example of a genetic r versus K selection game that promotes stable population cycles in lizards. Decade-long fitness studies and game theory demonstrated that two throat-colour morphs were refined by selection in which the strength of natural selection varied with density. Orange-throated females, r strategists, produced... (More)
A long-standing hypothesis posits that natural selection can favour two female strategies when density cycles. At low density, females producing many smaller progeny are favoured when the intrinsic rate of increase, r, governs population growth. At peak density, females producing fewer, high-quality, progeny are favoured when the carrying capacity, K, is exceeded and the population crashes. Here we report on the first example of a genetic r versus K selection game that promotes stable population cycles in lizards. Decade-long fitness studies and game theory demonstrated that two throat-colour morphs were refined by selection in which the strength of natural selection varied with density. Orange-throated females, r strategists, produced many eggs and were favoured at low density. Conversely, yellow-throated females, K strategists, produced large eggs and were favoured at high density. Progeny size should also be under negative frequency-dependent selection in that large progeny will have a survival advantage when rare, but the advantage disappears when they become common. We confirmed this prediction by seeding field plots with rare and common giant hatchlings. Thus, intrinsic causes of frequency- and density-dependent selection promotes an evolutionary game with two-generation oscillations. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nature
volume
406
issue
6799
pages
985 - 988
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000089020200042
  • scopus:0034739050
ISSN
0028-0836
DOI
10.1038/35023149
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
65fc5b55-9b02-4c40-8a0d-7a03adfa2ae0 (old id 131467)
date added to LUP
2007-06-26 12:12:58
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:40:18
@article{65fc5b55-9b02-4c40-8a0d-7a03adfa2ae0,
  abstract     = {A long-standing hypothesis posits that natural selection can favour two female strategies when density cycles. At low density, females producing many smaller progeny are favoured when the intrinsic rate of increase, r, governs population growth. At peak density, females producing fewer, high-quality, progeny are favoured when the carrying capacity, K, is exceeded and the population crashes. Here we report on the first example of a genetic r versus K selection game that promotes stable population cycles in lizards. Decade-long fitness studies and game theory demonstrated that two throat-colour morphs were refined by selection in which the strength of natural selection varied with density. Orange-throated females, r strategists, produced many eggs and were favoured at low density. Conversely, yellow-throated females, K strategists, produced large eggs and were favoured at high density. Progeny size should also be under negative frequency-dependent selection in that large progeny will have a survival advantage when rare, but the advantage disappears when they become common. We confirmed this prediction by seeding field plots with rare and common giant hatchlings. Thus, intrinsic causes of frequency- and density-dependent selection promotes an evolutionary game with two-generation oscillations.},
  author       = {Sinervo, B and Svensson, Erik and Comendant, T},
  issn         = {0028-0836},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6799},
  pages        = {985--988},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Nature},
  title        = {Density cycles and an offspring quantity and quality game driven by natural selection},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/35023149},
  volume       = {406},
  year         = {2000},
}