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Low-impact exercise during pregnancy - a study of safety.

Larsson, Linnea and Lindqvist, Pelle LU (2005) In Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 84(1). p.34-38
Abstract
Background. Exercise is an important part of many women's lives. Women are often advised to refrain from physical exercise during pregnancy. The reason given is mainly safety, i.e. fear of maternal hyperthermia, which is known to be related to neural tube defects. However, exercise during pregnancy has not been shown to be related to hyperthermia.



Objective. To study temperature and oxygen saturation responses to low-impact exercise in healthy pregnant women.



Methods. Forty pregnant women and 11 controls participating in low-impact aerobic exercise were monitored before exercise, at maximum-exercise level, and after exercise with regard to core temperature, heart rate, and oxygen saturation... (More)
Background. Exercise is an important part of many women's lives. Women are often advised to refrain from physical exercise during pregnancy. The reason given is mainly safety, i.e. fear of maternal hyperthermia, which is known to be related to neural tube defects. However, exercise during pregnancy has not been shown to be related to hyperthermia.



Objective. To study temperature and oxygen saturation responses to low-impact exercise in healthy pregnant women.



Methods. Forty pregnant women and 11 controls participating in low-impact aerobic exercise were monitored before exercise, at maximum-exercise level, and after exercise with regard to core temperature, heart rate, and oxygen saturation level.



Results. The core temperature among the pregnant women did not increase significantly at maximum exercise or after exercise (36.5 versus 36.7 or 36.5 °C, P = 0.1, P = 0.5). None of the pregnant women were even close to approaching a dangerous body temperature at an intensity level of 69% of their maximum heart rate. As compared with pre-exercise values, oxygen saturation among pregnant women was significantly reduced at both maximum-exercise and postexercise measurements, but no measurement was below 95% in oxygen saturation.



Conclusion. Low-impact aerobics at about 70% of one's maximum heart rate appears to be safe in terms of risk of maternal hyperthermia. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
volume
84
issue
1
pages
34 - 38
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • pmid:15603564
  • wos:000225771300006
  • scopus:13144307085
ISSN
1600-0412
DOI
10.1111/j.0001-6349.2005.00696.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1858bee4-2d24-441c-8967-f13c030f23fb (old id 132013)
date added to LUP
2007-07-25 10:27:27
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:32:31
@article{1858bee4-2d24-441c-8967-f13c030f23fb,
  abstract     = {Background. Exercise is an important part of many women's lives. Women are often advised to refrain from physical exercise during pregnancy. The reason given is mainly safety, i.e. fear of maternal hyperthermia, which is known to be related to neural tube defects. However, exercise during pregnancy has not been shown to be related to hyperthermia.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Objective. To study temperature and oxygen saturation responses to low-impact exercise in healthy pregnant women.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods. Forty pregnant women and 11 controls participating in low-impact aerobic exercise were monitored before exercise, at maximum-exercise level, and after exercise with regard to core temperature, heart rate, and oxygen saturation level.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results. The core temperature among the pregnant women did not increase significantly at maximum exercise or after exercise (36.5 versus 36.7 or 36.5 °C, P = 0.1, P = 0.5). None of the pregnant women were even close to approaching a dangerous body temperature at an intensity level of 69% of their maximum heart rate. As compared with pre-exercise values, oxygen saturation among pregnant women was significantly reduced at both maximum-exercise and postexercise measurements, but no measurement was below 95% in oxygen saturation.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion. Low-impact aerobics at about 70% of one's maximum heart rate appears to be safe in terms of risk of maternal hyperthermia.},
  author       = {Larsson, Linnea and Lindqvist, Pelle},
  issn         = {1600-0412},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {34--38},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Low-impact exercise during pregnancy - a study of safety.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0001-6349.2005.00696.x},
  volume       = {84},
  year         = {2005},
}