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Use of phospholipid fatty acids to detect previous self-heating events in stored peat

Ranneklev, Sissel Brit and Bååth, Erland LU (2003) In Applied and Environmental Microbiology 69(6). p.3532-3539
Abstract
The use of the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition of microorganisms to detect previous self-heating events was studied in naturally self-heated peat and in peat incubated under temperature-controlled conditions. An increased content of total PLFAs was found in self-heated peat compared to that in unheated peat. Two PLFAs, denoted T1 and T2, were detected only in the self-heated peat. Incubation of peat samples at 25 to 55°C for 4 days indicated that T1 and T2 were produced from microorganisms with different optimum temperatures. This was confirmed by isolation of bacteria at 55°C, which produced T2 but not T1. These bacteria produced another PLFA (denoted T3) which coeluted with 18:1{omega}7. T2 and T3 were identified as... (More)
The use of the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition of microorganisms to detect previous self-heating events was studied in naturally self-heated peat and in peat incubated under temperature-controlled conditions. An increased content of total PLFAs was found in self-heated peat compared to that in unheated peat. Two PLFAs, denoted T1 and T2, were detected only in the self-heated peat. Incubation of peat samples at 25 to 55°C for 4 days indicated that T1 and T2 were produced from microorganisms with different optimum temperatures. This was confirmed by isolation of bacteria at 55°C, which produced T2 but not T1. These bacteria produced another PLFA (denoted T3) which coeluted with 18:1{omega}7. T2 and T3 were identified as {omega}-cyclohexyltridecanoic acid and {omega}-cyclohexylundecanoic acid, respectively, indicating that the bacteria belonged to the genus Alicyclobacillus. T1 was tentatively identified as {omega}-cycloheptylundecanoic acid. T2 was detected 8 h after the peat incubation temperature was increased to 55°C, and maximum levels were found within 5 days of incubation. The PLFA 18:1{omega}7-T3 increased in proportion to T2. T1 was detected after 96 h at 55°C, and its level increased throughout the incubation period, so that it eventually became one of the dominant PLFAs after 80 days. In peat samples incubated at 55°C and then at 25°C, T1 and T2 disappeared slowly. After 3 months, detectable levels were still found. Incubation at 25°C after heating for 3 days at 55°C decreased the amounts of T2 and 18:1{omega}7-T3 faster than did incubation at 5°C. Thus, not only the duration and temperature during the heating event but also the storage temperature following heating are important for the detection of PLFAs indicating previous self-heating. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
volume
69
issue
6
pages
3532 - 3539
publisher
American Society for Microbiology
external identifiers
  • wos:000187156200064
  • pmid:12788760
  • scopus:0037640906
ISSN
0099-2240
DOI
10.1128/AEM.69.6.3532-3539.2003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8b61df42-1458-4b4d-95fa-c71f6a62b2e6 (old id 132884)
date added to LUP
2007-06-29 14:30:15
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:27:04
@article{8b61df42-1458-4b4d-95fa-c71f6a62b2e6,
  abstract     = {The use of the phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) composition of microorganisms to detect previous self-heating events was studied in naturally self-heated peat and in peat incubated under temperature-controlled conditions. An increased content of total PLFAs was found in self-heated peat compared to that in unheated peat. Two PLFAs, denoted T1 and T2, were detected only in the self-heated peat. Incubation of peat samples at 25 to 55°C for 4 days indicated that T1 and T2 were produced from microorganisms with different optimum temperatures. This was confirmed by isolation of bacteria at 55°C, which produced T2 but not T1. These bacteria produced another PLFA (denoted T3) which coeluted with 18:1{omega}7. T2 and T3 were identified as {omega}-cyclohexyltridecanoic acid and {omega}-cyclohexylundecanoic acid, respectively, indicating that the bacteria belonged to the genus Alicyclobacillus. T1 was tentatively identified as {omega}-cycloheptylundecanoic acid. T2 was detected 8 h after the peat incubation temperature was increased to 55°C, and maximum levels were found within 5 days of incubation. The PLFA 18:1{omega}7-T3 increased in proportion to T2. T1 was detected after 96 h at 55°C, and its level increased throughout the incubation period, so that it eventually became one of the dominant PLFAs after 80 days. In peat samples incubated at 55°C and then at 25°C, T1 and T2 disappeared slowly. After 3 months, detectable levels were still found. Incubation at 25°C after heating for 3 days at 55°C decreased the amounts of T2 and 18:1{omega}7-T3 faster than did incubation at 5°C. Thus, not only the duration and temperature during the heating event but also the storage temperature following heating are important for the detection of PLFAs indicating previous self-heating.},
  author       = {Ranneklev, Sissel Brit and Bååth, Erland},
  issn         = {0099-2240},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {3532--3539},
  publisher    = {American Society for Microbiology},
  series       = {Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
  title        = {Use of phospholipid fatty acids to detect previous self-heating events in stored peat},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.69.6.3532-3539.2003},
  volume       = {69},
  year         = {2003},
}