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Protein kinase C expression in the rabbit retina after laser photocoagulation.

Ghosh, Fredrik LU and Gjörloff, Karin LU (2005) In Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology 243(8). p.803-810
Abstract
Background: Laser photocoagulation is a well-established treatment for diabetic retinopathy but the mechanism behind its effectiveness has not been elucidated. The protein kinase C (PKC) family is a group of enzymes which has been the subject of extensive interest in clinically related research since the advent of its role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. With this study we wanted to explore whether PKC expression is altered in the retina after laser photocoagulation. Methods: Normal rabbit eyes were treated with laser photocoagulation of varying intensity and examined after 30 min to 7 weeks. Treated and untreated regions of the retina were investigated histologically with the MC5 monoclonal antibody against PKC. Labeling for... (More)
Background: Laser photocoagulation is a well-established treatment for diabetic retinopathy but the mechanism behind its effectiveness has not been elucidated. The protein kinase C (PKC) family is a group of enzymes which has been the subject of extensive interest in clinically related research since the advent of its role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. With this study we wanted to explore whether PKC expression is altered in the retina after laser photocoagulation. Methods: Normal rabbit eyes were treated with laser photocoagulation of varying intensity and examined after 30 min to 7 weeks. Treated and untreated regions of the retina were investigated histologically with the MC5 monoclonal antibody against PKC. Labeling for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), as well as hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was also performed to assess the laser-induced trauma. Results: In the normal retina, the MC5 antibody labeled rod bipolar cells and photoreceptor outer segments corresponding to PKC alpha. A translocated PKC expression with labeling concentrated in the rod bipolar terminals was seen in specimens examined 30 min after laser treatment, and after 1 week, no expression was seen in any part of the retina. After 2 weeks, PKC expression again indicated a translocated labeling pattern. After 5 weeks, labeling was found only in rod bipolar terminals in the peripheral retina. When comparing high- and low-intensity laser treatment 7 weeks postoperatively, no labeling was found in the high intensity-treated retinas, whereas low intensity-treated eyes displayed a near-normal labeling pattern. H&E staining revealed focal neuroretinal edema immediately after laser treatment, also in untreated areas. At later stages, destruction of the outer nuclear layer and migration of pigment epithelial cells in laser-lesioned areas was seen. GFAP-labeled Muller cells were seen 1 week postoperatively in the entire retina. Labeling after this time decreased, but was still present in laser spots after 5 and 7 weeks. Conclusions: Laser photocoagulation alters the expression of PKC in the entire normal rabbit retina. The response follows a temporal pattern and is also related to laser intensity. These findings may help to explain the high efficacy of laser treatment in diabetic retinopathy. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
GFAP, diabetes, retinopathy
in
Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology
volume
243
issue
8
pages
803 - 810
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • pmid:15778843
  • wos:000231457900012
  • scopus:24944541129
ISSN
1435-702X
DOI
10.1007/s00417-004-1112-7
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8f097133-9893-4a3b-b49d-c4fb08eddb47 (old id 134827)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=15778843&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-24 14:45:11
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:14:59
@article{8f097133-9893-4a3b-b49d-c4fb08eddb47,
  abstract     = {Background: Laser photocoagulation is a well-established treatment for diabetic retinopathy but the mechanism behind its effectiveness has not been elucidated. The protein kinase C (PKC) family is a group of enzymes which has been the subject of extensive interest in clinically related research since the advent of its role in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy. With this study we wanted to explore whether PKC expression is altered in the retina after laser photocoagulation. Methods: Normal rabbit eyes were treated with laser photocoagulation of varying intensity and examined after 30 min to 7 weeks. Treated and untreated regions of the retina were investigated histologically with the MC5 monoclonal antibody against PKC. Labeling for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), as well as hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining was also performed to assess the laser-induced trauma. Results: In the normal retina, the MC5 antibody labeled rod bipolar cells and photoreceptor outer segments corresponding to PKC alpha. A translocated PKC expression with labeling concentrated in the rod bipolar terminals was seen in specimens examined 30 min after laser treatment, and after 1 week, no expression was seen in any part of the retina. After 2 weeks, PKC expression again indicated a translocated labeling pattern. After 5 weeks, labeling was found only in rod bipolar terminals in the peripheral retina. When comparing high- and low-intensity laser treatment 7 weeks postoperatively, no labeling was found in the high intensity-treated retinas, whereas low intensity-treated eyes displayed a near-normal labeling pattern. H&E staining revealed focal neuroretinal edema immediately after laser treatment, also in untreated areas. At later stages, destruction of the outer nuclear layer and migration of pigment epithelial cells in laser-lesioned areas was seen. GFAP-labeled Muller cells were seen 1 week postoperatively in the entire retina. Labeling after this time decreased, but was still present in laser spots after 5 and 7 weeks. Conclusions: Laser photocoagulation alters the expression of PKC in the entire normal rabbit retina. The response follows a temporal pattern and is also related to laser intensity. These findings may help to explain the high efficacy of laser treatment in diabetic retinopathy.},
  author       = {Ghosh, Fredrik and Gjörloff, Karin},
  issn         = {1435-702X},
  keyword      = {GFAP,diabetes,retinopathy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {803--810},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology},
  title        = {Protein kinase C expression in the rabbit retina after laser photocoagulation.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00417-004-1112-7},
  volume       = {243},
  year         = {2005},
}