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Country of origin, social support and the risk of small for gestational age birth.

Dejin-Karlsson, Elisabeth and Östergren, Per-Olof LU (2004) In Scandinavian Journal of Public Health1999-01-01+01:00 32(6). p.442-449
Abstract
Aims: This study investigates the risk of small for gestational age (SGA) in relation to country of origin of the mother. The

role of psychosocial resources, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors was examined in different causal models. Methods:

Among all pregnant nulliparous women in the city of Malmo¨ , Sweden, who gave birth in 1991 – 92, 872 (87.7%) women

completed a questionnaire during their first antenatal visit. The study was carried out among women whose pregnancies

resulted in a singleton live birth (n~826); 22% (n~182) of these women were foreign-born. Results: Fifty-five (6.7%) of the

infants were classified as SGA, 37 (5.7%) of mothers of Swedish origin and 18 (9.7%) of foreign... (More)
Aims: This study investigates the risk of small for gestational age (SGA) in relation to country of origin of the mother. The

role of psychosocial resources, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors was examined in different causal models. Methods:

Among all pregnant nulliparous women in the city of Malmo¨ , Sweden, who gave birth in 1991 – 92, 872 (87.7%) women

completed a questionnaire during their first antenatal visit. The study was carried out among women whose pregnancies

resulted in a singleton live birth (n~826); 22% (n~182) of these women were foreign-born. Results: Fifty-five (6.7%) of the

infants were classified as SGA, 37 (5.7%) of mothers of Swedish origin and 18 (9.7%) of foreign origin. SGA deliveries were

much more prevalent among Middle East- and North Africa-born women (22%) and sub-Saharan-born women (15%). In

all, women of foreign origin had increased odds for delivering SGA babies (OR~1.8, 95% CI~1.0,3.2). In a multivariate

analysis psychosocial and socioeconomic factors explained 30% and 40%, respectively, of the increased SGA risk.

Psychosocial factors seemed to be more prominent risk factors for SGA among mothers of foreign origin. A possible

synergistic relation was demonstrated between foreign origin of the mother and low social anchorage. Conclusions: This

study showed that psychosocial factors, most probably linked to a disadvantaged social situation, could be the theoretically

most important focus for preventing SGA in immigrant women. This could also further support a hypothesis of a link

between psychosocial stress and SGA in general. However, this should not exclude the need for intervention in the antenatal

care system in terms of specially tailored support and education. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Small for Gestational Age, Life Style, Pregnancy, Pregnant Women: ethnology, Infant, Premature, Newborn, Adult, Birth Weight, Emigration and Immigration, Female, Humans, Questionnaires, Risk Factors, Social Support, Socioeconomic Factors, Sweden: epidemiology, Sweden: ethnology
in
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health1999-01-01+01:00
volume
32
issue
6
pages
442 - 449
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000225640500007
  • pmid:15762029
  • scopus:12544258830
ISSN
1651-1905
DOI
10.1080/14034940410028172
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
063ad5a4-5b27-48eb-91d7-7ba71aaa90e2 (old id 135034)
date added to LUP
2007-07-25 09:03:47
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:26:07
@article{063ad5a4-5b27-48eb-91d7-7ba71aaa90e2,
  abstract     = {Aims: This study investigates the risk of small for gestational age (SGA) in relation to country of origin of the mother. The<br/><br>
role of psychosocial resources, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors was examined in different causal models. Methods:<br/><br>
Among all pregnant nulliparous women in the city of Malmo¨ , Sweden, who gave birth in 1991 – 92, 872 (87.7%) women<br/><br>
completed a questionnaire during their first antenatal visit. The study was carried out among women whose pregnancies<br/><br>
resulted in a singleton live birth (n~826); 22% (n~182) of these women were foreign-born. Results: Fifty-five (6.7%) of the<br/><br>
infants were classified as SGA, 37 (5.7%) of mothers of Swedish origin and 18 (9.7%) of foreign origin. SGA deliveries were<br/><br>
much more prevalent among Middle East- and North Africa-born women (22%) and sub-Saharan-born women (15%). In<br/><br>
all, women of foreign origin had increased odds for delivering SGA babies (OR~1.8, 95% CI~1.0,3.2). In a multivariate<br/><br>
analysis psychosocial and socioeconomic factors explained 30% and 40%, respectively, of the increased SGA risk.<br/><br>
Psychosocial factors seemed to be more prominent risk factors for SGA among mothers of foreign origin. A possible<br/><br>
synergistic relation was demonstrated between foreign origin of the mother and low social anchorage. Conclusions: This<br/><br>
study showed that psychosocial factors, most probably linked to a disadvantaged social situation, could be the theoretically<br/><br>
most important focus for preventing SGA in immigrant women. This could also further support a hypothesis of a link<br/><br>
between psychosocial stress and SGA in general. However, this should not exclude the need for intervention in the antenatal<br/><br>
care system in terms of specially tailored support and education.},
  author       = {Dejin-Karlsson, Elisabeth and Östergren, Per-Olof},
  issn         = {1651-1905},
  keyword      = {Small for Gestational Age,Life Style,Pregnancy,Pregnant Women: ethnology,Infant,Premature,Newborn,Adult,Birth Weight,Emigration and Immigration,Female,Humans,Questionnaires,Risk Factors,Social Support,Socioeconomic Factors,Sweden: epidemiology,Sweden: ethnology},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {442--449},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Public Health1999-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Country of origin, social support and the risk of small for gestational age birth.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14034940410028172},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2004},
}