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Time to extinction in relation to mating system and type of density regulation in populations with two sexes

Saether, BE; Engen, S; Lande, R; Moller, AP; Bensch, Staffan LU ; Hasselquist, Dennis LU ; Beier, J and Leisler, B (2004) In Journal of Animal Ecology 73(5). p.925-934
Abstract
1. Population viability models usually consider only the female segment of the population. However, random variation in sex ratio as well as the mating system may also affect variation in fitness among females. Here we develop population models incorporating demographic stochasticity in both sexes. Furthermore, we consider the effects on the estimated time to extinction and whether density regulation acts only on females or on total population size. 2. We applied these models to two populations of polygynous great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus L. with differences in population trends to investigate the importance of considering sex in population viability models. 3. Demographic stochasticity was larger in a polygynous than in a... (More)
1. Population viability models usually consider only the female segment of the population. However, random variation in sex ratio as well as the mating system may also affect variation in fitness among females. Here we develop population models incorporating demographic stochasticity in both sexes. Furthermore, we consider the effects on the estimated time to extinction and whether density regulation acts only on females or on total population size. 2. We applied these models to two populations of polygynous great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus L. with differences in population trends to investigate the importance of considering sex in population viability models. 3. Demographic stochasticity was larger in a polygynous than in a monogamous mating system. 4. The estimated time to extinction was considerably shorter for a monogamous than for a polygynous mating system, particularly if density regulation acted only on females than rather on the total population. 5. This study demonstrates that structure of mating system must be included when making population viability analysis based on counts of total population sizes. It is especially important to model the specific effects of density regulation on the two sexes. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Animal Ecology
volume
73
issue
5
pages
925 - 934
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000223375900011
  • scopus:4344592945
ISSN
1365-2656
DOI
10.1111/j.0021-8790.2004.00869.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
59317d0e-d4a9-498c-9b58-b3b9d9576047 (old id 136919)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 13:54:09
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:49:08
@article{59317d0e-d4a9-498c-9b58-b3b9d9576047,
  abstract     = {1. Population viability models usually consider only the female segment of the population. However, random variation in sex ratio as well as the mating system may also affect variation in fitness among females. Here we develop population models incorporating demographic stochasticity in both sexes. Furthermore, we consider the effects on the estimated time to extinction and whether density regulation acts only on females or on total population size. 2. We applied these models to two populations of polygynous great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus L. with differences in population trends to investigate the importance of considering sex in population viability models. 3. Demographic stochasticity was larger in a polygynous than in a monogamous mating system. 4. The estimated time to extinction was considerably shorter for a monogamous than for a polygynous mating system, particularly if density regulation acted only on females than rather on the total population. 5. This study demonstrates that structure of mating system must be included when making population viability analysis based on counts of total population sizes. It is especially important to model the specific effects of density regulation on the two sexes.},
  author       = {Saether, BE and Engen, S and Lande, R and Moller, AP and Bensch, Staffan and Hasselquist, Dennis and Beier, J and Leisler, B},
  issn         = {1365-2656},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {925--934},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Animal Ecology},
  title        = {Time to extinction in relation to mating system and type of density regulation in populations with two sexes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0021-8790.2004.00869.x},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {2004},
}