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Good or bad bioethanol from a greenhouse gas perspective - What determines this?

Börjesson, Pål LU (2009) In Applied Energy 86(5). p.589-594
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to describe how the greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits of ethanol from agricultural crops depend on local conditions and calculation methods. The focus is mainly on the fuels used in the ethanol process and biogenic GHG from the soils cultivated. To ensure that "good" ethanol is produced, with reference to GHG benefits, the following demands must be met: (i) ethanol plants should use biomass and not fossil fuels, (ii) cultivation of annual feedstock crops should be avoided on land rich in carbon (above and below ground), such as peat soils used as permanent grassland, etc., (iii) by-products should be utilised efficiently in order to maximise their energy and GHG benefits and (iv) nitrous oxide emissions should be... (More)
The purpose of this study is to describe how the greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits of ethanol from agricultural crops depend on local conditions and calculation methods. The focus is mainly on the fuels used in the ethanol process and biogenic GHG from the soils cultivated. To ensure that "good" ethanol is produced, with reference to GHG benefits, the following demands must be met: (i) ethanol plants should use biomass and not fossil fuels, (ii) cultivation of annual feedstock crops should be avoided on land rich in carbon (above and below ground), such as peat soils used as permanent grassland, etc., (iii) by-products should be utilised efficiently in order to maximise their energy and GHG benefits and (iv) nitrous oxide emissions should be kept to a minimum by means of efficient fertilisation strategies, and the commercial nitrogen fertiliser utilised should be produced in plants which have nitrous oxide gas cleaning. Several of the current ethanol production systems worldwide fullfill the majority of these demands, whereas some production systems do not. Thus, the findings in this paper helps identifying current "good" systems, how today's "fairly good" systems could be improved, and which inherent "bad" systems that we should avoid. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Greenhouse gases, Ethanol, Biofuels, Agricultural crops, Life cycle assessment
in
Applied Energy
volume
86
issue
5
pages
589 - 594
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000263766400001
  • scopus:58949100302
ISSN
1872-9118
DOI
10.1016/j.apenergy.2008.11.025
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bfa3b888-71c5-429a-a452-1b14ebf1d177 (old id 1371994)
date added to LUP
2009-05-08 14:14:41
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:12:10
@article{bfa3b888-71c5-429a-a452-1b14ebf1d177,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this study is to describe how the greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits of ethanol from agricultural crops depend on local conditions and calculation methods. The focus is mainly on the fuels used in the ethanol process and biogenic GHG from the soils cultivated. To ensure that "good" ethanol is produced, with reference to GHG benefits, the following demands must be met: (i) ethanol plants should use biomass and not fossil fuels, (ii) cultivation of annual feedstock crops should be avoided on land rich in carbon (above and below ground), such as peat soils used as permanent grassland, etc., (iii) by-products should be utilised efficiently in order to maximise their energy and GHG benefits and (iv) nitrous oxide emissions should be kept to a minimum by means of efficient fertilisation strategies, and the commercial nitrogen fertiliser utilised should be produced in plants which have nitrous oxide gas cleaning. Several of the current ethanol production systems worldwide fullfill the majority of these demands, whereas some production systems do not. Thus, the findings in this paper helps identifying current "good" systems, how today's "fairly good" systems could be improved, and which inherent "bad" systems that we should avoid. (C) 2008 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Börjesson, Pål},
  issn         = {1872-9118},
  keyword      = {Greenhouse gases,Ethanol,Biofuels,Agricultural crops,Life cycle assessment},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {589--594},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Applied Energy},
  title        = {Good or bad bioethanol from a greenhouse gas perspective - What determines this?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2008.11.025},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2009},
}