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Rehearsal for Volhynia : Schutzmannschaft Battalion 201 and Hauptmann Roman Shukhevych in Occupied Belorussia, 1942

Rudling, Per A. LU (2019) In East European Politics and Societies (EEPS)
Abstract
In 2007, Roman Shukhevych (1907–1950), the commander of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA), was designated an official Ukrainian state hero. He has since become the object of an elaborate cult of personality. Lauded for his resistance to the Soviet authorities in 1944–1950, Shukhevych is highly controversial in neighbouring Poland for the ethnic cleansing that the UPA carried out in 1943–1944, as he commanded that organization. Over a few months, the UPA killed around ninety thousand Poles, expelling hundreds of thousands of others. The brutal efficiency of this campaign has to be seen in the context of the larger war, not least Shukhevych’s training by Nazi Germany, in particular the military experience he obtained as a captain in the... (More)
In 2007, Roman Shukhevych (1907–1950), the commander of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA), was designated an official Ukrainian state hero. He has since become the object of an elaborate cult of personality. Lauded for his resistance to the Soviet authorities in 1944–1950, Shukhevych is highly controversial in neighbouring Poland for the ethnic cleansing that the UPA carried out in 1943–1944, as he commanded that organization. Over a few months, the UPA killed around ninety thousand Poles, expelling hundreds of thousands of others. The brutal efficiency of this campaign has to be seen in the context of the larger war, not least Shukhevych’s training by Nazi Germany, in particular the military experience he obtained as a captain in the Ukrainian formation Nachtigall, and as a commanding officer in Schutzmannschaft Battalion 201, which served in occupied Belorussia. This article is an attempt at reconstruct Shukhevych’s whereabouts in 1942, in order to establish the context and praxis under which Shukhevych operated until deserting the auxiliary police in January 1943. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
Ukrainian Nationalism, Holocaust, Belorussia, World War II, Organization of Ukrainian Nationalists
in
East European Politics and Societies (EEPS)
pages
36 pages
publisher
SAGE Publications Inc.
external identifiers
  • scopus:85073970029
ISSN
1533-8371
DOI
10.1177/0888325419844817
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1383ba9f-0291-4c86-8a18-5b0cd0ea7ddc
date added to LUP
2019-01-20 17:40:07
date last changed
2019-11-13 05:24:52
@article{1383ba9f-0291-4c86-8a18-5b0cd0ea7ddc,
  abstract     = {In 2007, Roman Shukhevych (1907–1950), the commander of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA), was designated an official Ukrainian state hero. He has since become the object of an elaborate cult of personality. Lauded for his resistance to the Soviet authorities in 1944–1950, Shukhevych is highly controversial in neighbouring Poland for the ethnic cleansing that the UPA carried out in 1943–1944, as he commanded that organization. Over a few months, the UPA killed around ninety thousand Poles, expelling hundreds of thousands of others. The brutal efficiency of this campaign has to be seen in the context of the larger war, not least Shukhevych’s training by Nazi Germany, in particular the military experience he obtained as a captain in the Ukrainian formation Nachtigall, and as a commanding officer in Schutzmannschaft Battalion 201, which served in occupied Belorussia. This article is an attempt at reconstruct Shukhevych’s whereabouts in 1942, in order to establish the context and praxis under which Shukhevych operated until deserting the auxiliary police in January 1943.},
  author       = {Rudling, Per A.},
  issn         = {1533-8371},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {09},
  publisher    = {SAGE Publications Inc.},
  series       = {East European Politics and Societies (EEPS)},
  title        = {Rehearsal for Volhynia : Schutzmannschaft Battalion 201 and Hauptmann Roman Shukhevych in Occupied Belorussia, 1942},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0888325419844817},
  doi          = {10.1177/0888325419844817},
  year         = {2019},
}