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First incidence depression in the Lundby Study: A comparison of the two time periods 1947-1972 and 1972-1997.

Mattisson, Cecilia LU ; Bogren, Mats LU ; Nettelbladt, Per LU ; Munk-Jörgensen, Povl and Bhugra, Dinesh (2005) In Journal of Affective Disorders 87(2-3). p.151-160
Abstract
Background: The Lundby Study is a prospective, longitudinal study on a total population consisting of 3563 subjects during 50 years. This study compares first incidence rates of depression and cumulative probabilities for developing a depression over the two time periods 1947-1972 and 1972-1997. Method: The Lundby Study started in 1947. Follow-ups were carried out in 1957 and in 1972. In 1997 the surviving subjects (N = 1797) were interviewed by psychiatrists with a semi-structured interview. Best-estimate consensus diagnoses were used and ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnoses were added. Further, 1030 subjects who had died during the last follow-up period 19721997 were investigated. Results: Women had higher incidence rates than men in both... (More)
Background: The Lundby Study is a prospective, longitudinal study on a total population consisting of 3563 subjects during 50 years. This study compares first incidence rates of depression and cumulative probabilities for developing a depression over the two time periods 1947-1972 and 1972-1997. Method: The Lundby Study started in 1947. Follow-ups were carried out in 1957 and in 1972. In 1997 the surviving subjects (N = 1797) were interviewed by psychiatrists with a semi-structured interview. Best-estimate consensus diagnoses were used and ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnoses were added. Further, 1030 subjects who had died during the last follow-up period 19721997 were investigated. Results: Women had higher incidence rates than men in both periods. The average annual incidence rate was lower for women and tended to be lower for men 1972-1997 as compared with 1947-1972. The cumulative probability for developing a depression was 22.5% for men and 30.7% for women 1972-1997. In 1947-1972 the corresponding figures were 22.8% in men and 35.7% in women. Limitations: The recall period is of considerable length, probably introducing recall bias. The inter-rater reliability over 50 years is fairly acceptable concerning depression. Conclusion: Lower annual standardised incidence rates were seen in 1972-1997 compared with 1947-1972. These findings suggest that the trend of increasing rates of depression in the Lundby cohort has terminated. Incidence rates and cumulative probabilities to develop a depression were higher for women than for men indicating that gender differences continue to play a role. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
the Lundby Study, depression, psychiatric epidemiology, prospective study, incidence study
in
Journal of Affective Disorders
volume
87
issue
2-3
pages
151 - 160
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000231321500002
  • pmid:15979153
  • scopus:22844434564
ISSN
1573-2517
DOI
10.1016/j.jad.2005.04.002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
14b7ec17-8107-40f8-a1cf-45508a59a5da (old id 139746)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15979153&query_hl=81
date added to LUP
2007-07-16 12:58:48
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:38:32
@article{14b7ec17-8107-40f8-a1cf-45508a59a5da,
  abstract     = {Background: The Lundby Study is a prospective, longitudinal study on a total population consisting of 3563 subjects during 50 years. This study compares first incidence rates of depression and cumulative probabilities for developing a depression over the two time periods 1947-1972 and 1972-1997. Method: The Lundby Study started in 1947. Follow-ups were carried out in 1957 and in 1972. In 1997 the surviving subjects (N = 1797) were interviewed by psychiatrists with a semi-structured interview. Best-estimate consensus diagnoses were used and ICD-10 and DSM-IV diagnoses were added. Further, 1030 subjects who had died during the last follow-up period 19721997 were investigated. Results: Women had higher incidence rates than men in both periods. The average annual incidence rate was lower for women and tended to be lower for men 1972-1997 as compared with 1947-1972. The cumulative probability for developing a depression was 22.5% for men and 30.7% for women 1972-1997. In 1947-1972 the corresponding figures were 22.8% in men and 35.7% in women. Limitations: The recall period is of considerable length, probably introducing recall bias. The inter-rater reliability over 50 years is fairly acceptable concerning depression. Conclusion: Lower annual standardised incidence rates were seen in 1972-1997 compared with 1947-1972. These findings suggest that the trend of increasing rates of depression in the Lundby cohort has terminated. Incidence rates and cumulative probabilities to develop a depression were higher for women than for men indicating that gender differences continue to play a role.},
  author       = {Mattisson, Cecilia and Bogren, Mats and Nettelbladt, Per and Munk-Jörgensen, Povl and Bhugra, Dinesh},
  issn         = {1573-2517},
  keyword      = {the Lundby Study,depression,psychiatric epidemiology,prospective study,incidence study},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2-3},
  pages        = {151--160},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Journal of Affective Disorders},
  title        = {First incidence depression in the Lundby Study: A comparison of the two time periods 1947-1972 and 1972-1997.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2005.04.002},
  volume       = {87},
  year         = {2005},
}