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Regulated transport as a mechanism for pattern generation: Capabilities for phyllotaxis and beyond

Sahlin, Patrik LU ; Söderberg, Bo LU and Jönsson, Henrik LU (2009) In Journal of Theoretical Biology 258. p.60-70
Abstract
Large-scale pattern formation is a frequently occurring phenomenon in biological organisms, and several local interaction rules for generating such patterns have been suggested. A mechanism driven by feedback between the plant hormone auxin and its polarly localized transport mediator PINFORMED1 has been proposed as a model for phyllotactic patterns in plants. It has been shown to agree with current biological experiments at a molecular level as well as with respect to the resulting patterns. We present a thorough investigation of variants of models based on auxin-regulated polarized transport and use analytical and numerical tools to derive requirements for these models to drive spontaneous pattern formation. We find that auxin... (More)
Large-scale pattern formation is a frequently occurring phenomenon in biological organisms, and several local interaction rules for generating such patterns have been suggested. A mechanism driven by feedback between the plant hormone auxin and its polarly localized transport mediator PINFORMED1 has been proposed as a model for phyllotactic patterns in plants. It has been shown to agree with current biological experiments at a molecular level as well as with respect to the resulting patterns. We present a thorough investigation of variants of models based on auxin-regulated polarized transport and use analytical and numerical tools to derive requirements for these models to drive spontaneous pattern formation. We find that auxin concentrations in neighboring cells can feed back either on exocytosis or endocytosis and still produce patterns. In agreement with mutant experiments, the active cellular efflux is shown to be more important for pattern capabilities as compared to active influx. We also find that the feedback must originate from neighboring cells rather than from neighboring walls and that intracellular competition for the transport mediator is required for patterning. The importance of model parameters is investigated, especially regarding robustness to perturbations of experimentally estimated parameter values. Finally, the regulated transport mechanism is shown to be able to generate Turing patterns of various types. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Theoretical Biology
volume
258
pages
60 - 70
publisher
Academic Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000265312800007
  • scopus:63549137884
ISSN
1095-8541
DOI
10.1016/j.jtbi.2009.01.019
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6ebeff9d-2bb5-4df3-9ece-aa0f8aac36dc (old id 1398314)
date added to LUP
2009-05-20 13:20:20
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:06:29
@article{6ebeff9d-2bb5-4df3-9ece-aa0f8aac36dc,
  abstract     = {Large-scale pattern formation is a frequently occurring phenomenon in biological organisms, and several local interaction rules for generating such patterns have been suggested. A mechanism driven by feedback between the plant hormone auxin and its polarly localized transport mediator PINFORMED1 has been proposed as a model for phyllotactic patterns in plants. It has been shown to agree with current biological experiments at a molecular level as well as with respect to the resulting patterns. We present a thorough investigation of variants of models based on auxin-regulated polarized transport and use analytical and numerical tools to derive requirements for these models to drive spontaneous pattern formation. We find that auxin concentrations in neighboring cells can feed back either on exocytosis or endocytosis and still produce patterns. In agreement with mutant experiments, the active cellular efflux is shown to be more important for pattern capabilities as compared to active influx. We also find that the feedback must originate from neighboring cells rather than from neighboring walls and that intracellular competition for the transport mediator is required for patterning. The importance of model parameters is investigated, especially regarding robustness to perturbations of experimentally estimated parameter values. Finally, the regulated transport mechanism is shown to be able to generate Turing patterns of various types.},
  author       = {Sahlin, Patrik and Söderberg, Bo and Jönsson, Henrik},
  issn         = {1095-8541},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {60--70},
  publisher    = {Academic Press},
  series       = {Journal of Theoretical Biology},
  title        = {Regulated transport as a mechanism for pattern generation: Capabilities for phyllotaxis and beyond},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jtbi.2009.01.019},
  volume       = {258},
  year         = {2009},
}