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Correlation of birth injury with maternal height and birthweight.

Gudmundsson, Saemundur LU ; Henningsson, Anne-Charlotte LU and Lindqvist, Pelle LU (2005) In BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology 112(6). p.764-767
Abstract
Background Infant or maternal injury during vaginal delivery is a constant threat to all involved, but difficult to predict.



Objective To estimate the risk of birth injuries in an institution favouring trial of vaginal birth when there was doubt of the best mode of delivery.



Design A retrospective cohort study.



Setting University Hospital.



Population Singleton 14,359 vaginal deliveries in cephalic presentation during 5½ years.



Methods The total caesarean section rate during this period was 9%. The likelihood of injury was evaluated by logistic regression analysis with injury as the dependent variable and maternal height and child birthweight as... (More)
Background Infant or maternal injury during vaginal delivery is a constant threat to all involved, but difficult to predict.



Objective To estimate the risk of birth injuries in an institution favouring trial of vaginal birth when there was doubt of the best mode of delivery.



Design A retrospective cohort study.



Setting University Hospital.



Population Singleton 14,359 vaginal deliveries in cephalic presentation during 5½ years.



Methods The total caesarean section rate during this period was 9%. The likelihood of injury was evaluated by logistic regression analysis with injury as the dependent variable and maternal height and child birthweight as explanatory variables in birth injury risk estimation.



Main outcome measures Infant injury defined as one of the following: shoulder dystocia, clavicle fracture or brachial plexus injury; and maternal injury as anal sphincter rupture (ASR).



Results There were a total of 318 infant injuries in 282 infants and 423 ASRs. A strong correlation was found between injury and both fetal macrosomia and short maternal stature, but macrosomia was a stronger indicator of injury. Birth injury risk estimation curves were constructed based on maternal height and birthweight.



Conclusions The present results confirm a strong correlation between fetal macrosomia and short maternal stature and the likelihood of injury during vaginal birth. Risk estimation curves were constructed that might be of great value for the obstetrician in choosing the mode of delivery in these cases. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology
volume
112
issue
6
pages
764 - 767
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000229728800017
  • pmid:15924534
  • scopus:20744434701
ISSN
1471-0528
DOI
10.1111/j.1471-0528.2004.00545.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b94d8be4-0e8b-4320-8cda-14ebfa91fe69 (old id 140433)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=pubmed&dopt=Abstract&list_uids=15924534&query_hl=85
date added to LUP
2007-07-23 11:11:01
date last changed
2017-07-09 04:27:30
@article{b94d8be4-0e8b-4320-8cda-14ebfa91fe69,
  abstract     = {Background Infant or maternal injury during vaginal delivery is a constant threat to all involved, but difficult to predict.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Objective To estimate the risk of birth injuries in an institution favouring trial of vaginal birth when there was doubt of the best mode of delivery.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Design A retrospective cohort study.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Setting University Hospital.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Population Singleton 14,359 vaginal deliveries in cephalic presentation during 5½ years.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods The total caesarean section rate during this period was 9%. The likelihood of injury was evaluated by logistic regression analysis with injury as the dependent variable and maternal height and child birthweight as explanatory variables in birth injury risk estimation.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Main outcome measures Infant injury defined as one of the following: shoulder dystocia, clavicle fracture or brachial plexus injury; and maternal injury as anal sphincter rupture (ASR).<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results There were a total of 318 infant injuries in 282 infants and 423 ASRs. A strong correlation was found between injury and both fetal macrosomia and short maternal stature, but macrosomia was a stronger indicator of injury. Birth injury risk estimation curves were constructed based on maternal height and birthweight.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions The present results confirm a strong correlation between fetal macrosomia and short maternal stature and the likelihood of injury during vaginal birth. Risk estimation curves were constructed that might be of great value for the obstetrician in choosing the mode of delivery in these cases.},
  author       = {Gudmundsson, Saemundur and Henningsson, Anne-Charlotte and Lindqvist, Pelle},
  issn         = {1471-0528},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {764--767},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology},
  title        = {Correlation of birth injury with maternal height and birthweight.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-0528.2004.00545.x},
  volume       = {112},
  year         = {2005},
}