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Sex differences in the association between body mass index and total hip or knee joint replacement resulting from osteoarthritis

Franklin, Jonas LU ; Ingvarsson, T.; Englund, Martin LU and Lohmander, Stefan LU (2009) In Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 68(4). p.536-540
Abstract
Objective: To examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and osteoarthritis (OA) leading to total hip (THR) or knee (TKR) joint replacement. Methods: Case-control study design. All patients still living in Iceland who had had a THR or TKR resulting from OA before the end of 2002 were invited to participate. First-degree relatives of participating patients served as controls. A total of 1473 patients ( 872 women) and 1103 controls ( 599 women), all born between 1910 and 1939 and who had answered a questionnaire including questions about height and weight, were analysed. A randomly selected sample, representative of the Icelandic population, was used as a secondary control group. Results: The OR, adjusted for age, occupation and... (More)
Objective: To examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and osteoarthritis (OA) leading to total hip (THR) or knee (TKR) joint replacement. Methods: Case-control study design. All patients still living in Iceland who had had a THR or TKR resulting from OA before the end of 2002 were invited to participate. First-degree relatives of participating patients served as controls. A total of 1473 patients ( 872 women) and 1103 controls ( 599 women), all born between 1910 and 1939 and who had answered a questionnaire including questions about height and weight, were analysed. A randomly selected sample, representative of the Icelandic population, was used as a secondary control group. Results: The OR, adjusted for age, occupation and presence of hand OA, for having a THR was 1.1 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.5) for overweight men and 1.7 ( 95% CI 1.0 to 2.9) for obese men. The OR for having a TKR was 1.7 ( 95% CI 1.1 to 2.6) for overweight men and 5.3 ( 95% CI 2.8 to 10.1) for obese men. The OR for having a THR was 1.0 ( 95% CI 0.8 to 1.3) for overweight women and 1.0 ( 95% CI 0.6 to 1.5) for obese women. The OR for having a TKR was 1.6 ( 95% CI 1.1 to 2.2) for overweight women and 4.0 ( 95% CI 2.6 to 6.1) for obese women. Conclusion: This study supports a positive association between high BMI and TKR in both sexes, but for THR the association with BMI seems to be weaker, and possibly negligible for women. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
volume
68
issue
4
pages
536 - 540
publisher
British Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000264196000015
  • scopus:65249189311
ISSN
1468-2060
DOI
10.1136/ard.2007.086868
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e76d6ec8-cb0a-4f0e-9ab3-cb4fc0dfc20b (old id 1405118)
date added to LUP
2009-06-15 09:58:41
date last changed
2017-05-14 04:04:49
@article{e76d6ec8-cb0a-4f0e-9ab3-cb4fc0dfc20b,
  abstract     = {Objective: To examine the association between body mass index (BMI) and osteoarthritis (OA) leading to total hip (THR) or knee (TKR) joint replacement. Methods: Case-control study design. All patients still living in Iceland who had had a THR or TKR resulting from OA before the end of 2002 were invited to participate. First-degree relatives of participating patients served as controls. A total of 1473 patients ( 872 women) and 1103 controls ( 599 women), all born between 1910 and 1939 and who had answered a questionnaire including questions about height and weight, were analysed. A randomly selected sample, representative of the Icelandic population, was used as a secondary control group. Results: The OR, adjusted for age, occupation and presence of hand OA, for having a THR was 1.1 (95% CI 0.9 to 1.5) for overweight men and 1.7 ( 95% CI 1.0 to 2.9) for obese men. The OR for having a TKR was 1.7 ( 95% CI 1.1 to 2.6) for overweight men and 5.3 ( 95% CI 2.8 to 10.1) for obese men. The OR for having a THR was 1.0 ( 95% CI 0.8 to 1.3) for overweight women and 1.0 ( 95% CI 0.6 to 1.5) for obese women. The OR for having a TKR was 1.6 ( 95% CI 1.1 to 2.2) for overweight women and 4.0 ( 95% CI 2.6 to 6.1) for obese women. Conclusion: This study supports a positive association between high BMI and TKR in both sexes, but for THR the association with BMI seems to be weaker, and possibly negligible for women.},
  author       = {Franklin, Jonas and Ingvarsson, T. and Englund, Martin and Lohmander, Stefan},
  issn         = {1468-2060},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {536--540},
  publisher    = {British Medical Association},
  series       = {Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  title        = {Sex differences in the association between body mass index and total hip or knee joint replacement resulting from osteoarthritis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ard.2007.086868},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {2009},
}