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Important research questions in allergy and related diseases: 3-chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis - a GA(2)LEN study

Bachert, C.; Van Bruaene, N.; Toskala, E.; Zhang, N.; Olze, H.; Scadding, G.; Van Drunen, C. M.; Mullol, J.; Cardell, L. and Gevaert, P., et al. (2009) In Allergy 64(4). p.520-533
Abstract
Chronic rhinosinusitis is one of the most common health care challenges, with significant direct medical costs and severe impact on lower airway disease and general health outcomes. The diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) currently is based on clinical signs, nasal endoscopy and CT scanning, and therapeutic recommendations are focussing on 2 classes of drugs, corticosteroids and antibiotics. A better understanding of the pathogenesis and the factors amplifying mucosal inflammation therefore seems to be crucial for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In an effort to extend knowledge in this area, the WP 2.7.2 of the GA(2)LEN network of excellence currently collects data and samples of 1000 CRS patients and 250... (More)
Chronic rhinosinusitis is one of the most common health care challenges, with significant direct medical costs and severe impact on lower airway disease and general health outcomes. The diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) currently is based on clinical signs, nasal endoscopy and CT scanning, and therapeutic recommendations are focussing on 2 classes of drugs, corticosteroids and antibiotics. A better understanding of the pathogenesis and the factors amplifying mucosal inflammation therefore seems to be crucial for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In an effort to extend knowledge in this area, the WP 2.7.2 of the GA(2)LEN network of excellence currently collects data and samples of 1000 CRS patients and 250 control subjects. The main objective of this project is to characterize patients with upper airway disease on the basis of clinical parameters, infectious agents, inflammatory mechanisms and remodeling processes. This collaborative research will result in better knowledge on patient phenotypes, pathomechanisms, and subtypes in chronic rhinosinusitis. This review summarizes the state of the art on chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis in different aspects of the disease. It defines potential gaps in the current research, and points to future research perspectives and targets. (Less)
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organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
superantigens, nasal polyposis, inflammation, biomarkers, chronic rhinosinusitis, T-cells
in
Allergy
volume
64
issue
4
pages
520 - 533
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000264162600003
  • scopus:62549086996
ISSN
1398-9995
DOI
10.1111/j.1398-9995.2009.01964.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c722268e-6ba0-4705-856e-c97b6e53a09f (old id 1405141)
date added to LUP
2009-06-15 09:59:00
date last changed
2017-09-10 04:17:56
@article{c722268e-6ba0-4705-856e-c97b6e53a09f,
  abstract     = {Chronic rhinosinusitis is one of the most common health care challenges, with significant direct medical costs and severe impact on lower airway disease and general health outcomes. The diagnosis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) currently is based on clinical signs, nasal endoscopy and CT scanning, and therapeutic recommendations are focussing on 2 classes of drugs, corticosteroids and antibiotics. A better understanding of the pathogenesis and the factors amplifying mucosal inflammation therefore seems to be crucial for the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In an effort to extend knowledge in this area, the WP 2.7.2 of the GA(2)LEN network of excellence currently collects data and samples of 1000 CRS patients and 250 control subjects. The main objective of this project is to characterize patients with upper airway disease on the basis of clinical parameters, infectious agents, inflammatory mechanisms and remodeling processes. This collaborative research will result in better knowledge on patient phenotypes, pathomechanisms, and subtypes in chronic rhinosinusitis. This review summarizes the state of the art on chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis in different aspects of the disease. It defines potential gaps in the current research, and points to future research perspectives and targets.},
  author       = {Bachert, C. and Van Bruaene, N. and Toskala, E. and Zhang, N. and Olze, H. and Scadding, G. and Van Drunen, C. M. and Mullol, J. and Cardell, L. and Gevaert, P. and Van Zele, T. and Claeys, S. and Halldén, Christer and Kostamo, K. and Foerster, U. and Kowalski, M. and Bieniek, K. and Olszewska-Ziaber, A. and Nizankowska-Mogilnicka, E. and Szczeklik, A. and Swierczynska, M. and Arcimowicz, M. and Lund, V. and Fokkens, W. and Zuberbier, T. and Akdis, C. and Canonica, G. and Van Cauwenberge, P. and Burney, P. and Bousquet, J.},
  issn         = {1398-9995},
  keyword      = {superantigens,nasal polyposis,inflammation,biomarkers,chronic rhinosinusitis,T-cells},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {520--533},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Allergy},
  title        = {Important research questions in allergy and related diseases: 3-chronic rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis - a GA(2)LEN study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1398-9995.2009.01964.x},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2009},
}