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The energy using products (EuP) directive and product chain innovation

van Rossem, Chris LU and Dalhammar, Carl LU (2004) International Congress and Exhibition on Electronics Goes Green 2004+ In Electronics Goes Green 2004 (Plus): Driving Forces for Future Electronics, Proceedings p.997-1002
Abstract
The Energy using products (EuP) directive proposed by the European Commission is often referred to as "the first Integrated Product Policy (IPP) directive". The main purpose of the directive is to ensure the free movement of EuP in the internal market as well as to improve the environmental performance of products throughout their life cycle. Product groups likely to be addressed through the directive include consumer electronics, electric motor systems, heating and water-heating systems, other domestic appliances and lighting. The directive aims to facilitate harmonisation of national standards, simplify EU legislation and involve industry (via standardisation) in formulating technical requirements. These developments have great potential... (More)
The Energy using products (EuP) directive proposed by the European Commission is often referred to as "the first Integrated Product Policy (IPP) directive". The main purpose of the directive is to ensure the free movement of EuP in the internal market as well as to improve the environmental performance of products throughout their life cycle. Product groups likely to be addressed through the directive include consumer electronics, electric motor systems, heating and water-heating systems, other domestic appliances and lighting. The directive aims to facilitate harmonisation of national standards, simplify EU legislation and involve industry (via standardisation) in formulating technical requirements. These developments have great potential in theory: they can stimulate continuous improvements in eco-design, improve the environmental performance in various phases of the life cycle, and create first mover advantages for European industry. However, the initiatives have been met with scepticism and criticism from many concerned stakeholders. In this paper we will describe the history of the EuP directive, its main content, some of the controversial issues, and discuss its potential to act as a driver for eco-design. (Less)
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Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
Electronics Goes Green 2004 (Plus): Driving Forces for Future Electronics, Proceedings
pages
997 - 1002
publisher
Fraunhofer IRB Verlag
conference name
International Congress and Exhibition on Electronics Goes Green 2004+
external identifiers
  • wos:000232100200161
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
65a2a203-8827-48ce-bfea-209aaf5945c0 (old id 1406394)
date added to LUP
2009-06-05 14:12:13
date last changed
2016-04-16 07:35:08
@inproceedings{65a2a203-8827-48ce-bfea-209aaf5945c0,
  abstract     = {The Energy using products (EuP) directive proposed by the European Commission is often referred to as "the first Integrated Product Policy (IPP) directive". The main purpose of the directive is to ensure the free movement of EuP in the internal market as well as to improve the environmental performance of products throughout their life cycle. Product groups likely to be addressed through the directive include consumer electronics, electric motor systems, heating and water-heating systems, other domestic appliances and lighting. The directive aims to facilitate harmonisation of national standards, simplify EU legislation and involve industry (via standardisation) in formulating technical requirements. These developments have great potential in theory: they can stimulate continuous improvements in eco-design, improve the environmental performance in various phases of the life cycle, and create first mover advantages for European industry. However, the initiatives have been met with scepticism and criticism from many concerned stakeholders. In this paper we will describe the history of the EuP directive, its main content, some of the controversial issues, and discuss its potential to act as a driver for eco-design.},
  author       = {van Rossem, Chris and Dalhammar, Carl},
  booktitle    = {Electronics Goes Green 2004 (Plus): Driving Forces for Future Electronics, Proceedings},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {997--1002},
  publisher    = {Fraunhofer IRB Verlag},
  title        = {The energy using products (EuP) directive and product chain innovation},
  year         = {2004},
}