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Some medical and biological applications of ultrafast lasers

Svanberg, Sune LU (2004) 4th International Conference on Ultrafast Optics In International Conference on Ultrafast Optics IV 95. p.437-448
Abstract
Ultrafast lasers are finding many applications in medicine and biology. Pulses from such systems can be used directly or after non-linear modification. Direct utilisation includes time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. Such studies can be performed for tissue diagnosis in the field of malignant diseases as well as in the cardiovascular sector. Two-photon induced fluorescence provides a basis for high-quality optical microscopy, and optical coherence tomography with ultra-short and thus broadband pulses allow a radar-like depth-ranging into tissue. Photon propagation in scattering media also has important applications in optical mammography, dosimetry for photodynamic therapy and species concentration assessment. Intense... (More)
Ultrafast lasers are finding many applications in medicine and biology. Pulses from such systems can be used directly or after non-linear modification. Direct utilisation includes time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. Such studies can be performed for tissue diagnosis in the field of malignant diseases as well as in the cardiovascular sector. Two-photon induced fluorescence provides a basis for high-quality optical microscopy, and optical coherence tomography with ultra-short and thus broadband pulses allow a radar-like depth-ranging into tissue. Photon propagation in scattering media also has important applications in optical mammography, dosimetry for photodynamic therapy and species concentration assessment. Intense continua of electromagnetic radiation of very brief duration are formed in the interaction of focused ultra-short and intense laser pulses with matter. Focusing into water, or better, a photonic band-gap fibre, leads to the generation of a light continuum through self-phase modulation. The propagation of white light through tissue was studied addressing questions related to tissue chromophore concentration measurements employing their absorptive imprint in the light. Even free gas enclosures in solids and liquids give rise to an absorptive signature, which, however, is typically 10(4) times narrower than spectral structures in the matrix material. Such sharp features are best detected by wavelength modulation of a single-mode laser; and many new applications of gas-in-scattering-media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) are developing. When terawatt laser pulses are focused onto a solid target with high nuclear charge Z, intense X-ray radiation of few ps duration and with energies exceeding hundreds of keV is emitted. Biomedical applications of this radiation are described, including differential absorption and gated-viewing imaging. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
in
International Conference on Ultrafast Optics IV
volume
95
pages
437 - 448
publisher
Springer
conference name
4th International Conference on Ultrafast Optics
external identifiers
  • wos:000222127000055
ISSN
0342-4111
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0655ab51-bf5f-4de7-bb0a-6f2d09f84790 (old id 1406721)
date added to LUP
2009-06-04 11:22:47
date last changed
2016-04-16 04:21:53
@inproceedings{0655ab51-bf5f-4de7-bb0a-6f2d09f84790,
  abstract     = {Ultrafast lasers are finding many applications in medicine and biology. Pulses from such systems can be used directly or after non-linear modification. Direct utilisation includes time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging. Such studies can be performed for tissue diagnosis in the field of malignant diseases as well as in the cardiovascular sector. Two-photon induced fluorescence provides a basis for high-quality optical microscopy, and optical coherence tomography with ultra-short and thus broadband pulses allow a radar-like depth-ranging into tissue. Photon propagation in scattering media also has important applications in optical mammography, dosimetry for photodynamic therapy and species concentration assessment. Intense continua of electromagnetic radiation of very brief duration are formed in the interaction of focused ultra-short and intense laser pulses with matter. Focusing into water, or better, a photonic band-gap fibre, leads to the generation of a light continuum through self-phase modulation. The propagation of white light through tissue was studied addressing questions related to tissue chromophore concentration measurements employing their absorptive imprint in the light. Even free gas enclosures in solids and liquids give rise to an absorptive signature, which, however, is typically 10(4) times narrower than spectral structures in the matrix material. Such sharp features are best detected by wavelength modulation of a single-mode laser; and many new applications of gas-in-scattering-media absorption spectroscopy (GASMAS) are developing. When terawatt laser pulses are focused onto a solid target with high nuclear charge Z, intense X-ray radiation of few ps duration and with energies exceeding hundreds of keV is emitted. Biomedical applications of this radiation are described, including differential absorption and gated-viewing imaging.},
  author       = {Svanberg, Sune},
  booktitle    = {International Conference on Ultrafast Optics IV},
  issn         = {0342-4111},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {437--448},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  title        = {Some medical and biological applications of ultrafast lasers},
  volume       = {95},
  year         = {2004},
}