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rCBF pathology in Alzheimer's disease is associated with slow processing speed

Warkentin, Siegbert LU ; Erikson, Catarina LU and Janciauskiene, Sabina LU (2008) In Neuropsychologia 46(5). p.1193-1200
Abstract
Decreased information processing speed (mental slowing) is a known sequelae of many brain disorders, and can be assessed by continuous naming tasks. Functional imaging studies have shown that pause and articulation times in continuous speech are normally associated with different brain regions, but knowledge about such association in dementia is lacking. We therefore tested the hypothesis that perfusion deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not only associated with slower processing, but also with these speech measures. Using regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements during the performance of a continuous colour and form-naming task, we found that naming speed was substantially slower in AD patients than in controls. This slower... (More)
Decreased information processing speed (mental slowing) is a known sequelae of many brain disorders, and can be assessed by continuous naming tasks. Functional imaging studies have shown that pause and articulation times in continuous speech are normally associated with different brain regions, but knowledge about such association in dementia is lacking. We therefore tested the hypothesis that perfusion deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not only associated with slower processing, but also with these speech measures. Using regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements during the performance of a continuous colour and form-naming task, we found that naming speed was substantially slower in AD patients than in controls. This slower naming was exclusively determined by an increase in mean pause time, and only to a limited extent by articulation time. The increased pause time was uniquely associated with temporo-parietal rCBF reductions of the patients, while articulation was not. By contrast, the rCBF of healthy elderly control subjects was consistently accompanied by substantially shorter articulation and pause times, although the naming measures were not statistically associated with rCBF. These findings suggest that pause time (in contrast to articulation time) may serve as a sensitive measure in the assessment of information processing speed deficits in dementia, by virtue of its close association with brain pathology. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
dementia, Alzheimer's disease, time, articulation, pause time, brian imaging, information processing speed
in
Neuropsychologia
volume
46
issue
5
pages
1193 - 1200
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000256789500001
  • scopus:42749087642
ISSN
1873-3514
DOI
10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2007.08.029
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
decc52ce-8d9a-498f-a4b1-d9bfcf4dc7bb (old id 1406846)
date added to LUP
2009-06-04 09:54:07
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:53:47
@article{decc52ce-8d9a-498f-a4b1-d9bfcf4dc7bb,
  abstract     = {Decreased information processing speed (mental slowing) is a known sequelae of many brain disorders, and can be assessed by continuous naming tasks. Functional imaging studies have shown that pause and articulation times in continuous speech are normally associated with different brain regions, but knowledge about such association in dementia is lacking. We therefore tested the hypothesis that perfusion deficits in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are not only associated with slower processing, but also with these speech measures. Using regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measurements during the performance of a continuous colour and form-naming task, we found that naming speed was substantially slower in AD patients than in controls. This slower naming was exclusively determined by an increase in mean pause time, and only to a limited extent by articulation time. The increased pause time was uniquely associated with temporo-parietal rCBF reductions of the patients, while articulation was not. By contrast, the rCBF of healthy elderly control subjects was consistently accompanied by substantially shorter articulation and pause times, although the naming measures were not statistically associated with rCBF. These findings suggest that pause time (in contrast to articulation time) may serve as a sensitive measure in the assessment of information processing speed deficits in dementia, by virtue of its close association with brain pathology. (C) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Warkentin, Siegbert and Erikson, Catarina and Janciauskiene, Sabina},
  issn         = {1873-3514},
  keyword      = {dementia,Alzheimer's disease,time,articulation,pause time,brian imaging,information processing speed},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1193--1200},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Neuropsychologia},
  title        = {rCBF pathology in Alzheimer's disease is associated with slow processing speed},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2007.08.029},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2008},
}