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The glioma cell edge - winning by engulfing the enemy?

Persson, Annette LU and Englund, Elisabet LU (2009) In Medical Hypotheses 73. p.336-337
Abstract
Malignant glioma and glioblastoma multiforme form the largest group of highly malignant brain tumours, for which there is yet no definitive cure. Different approaches to treatment have been tried, in vain or with minimal benefit for the patient. In addition to surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, immunotherapy aiming at evoking an inflammatory reaction against the tumour itself has been tried. Immunotherapy has shown good results in an experimental mouse model, but no convincing efficacy/success in patients. Why are the gliomas always winning, how do they take the lead? The following phenomena lead us to propose an hypothesis about the reason for the glioma lead: the reported findings of phagocytic activity in reactive and neoplastic... (More)
Malignant glioma and glioblastoma multiforme form the largest group of highly malignant brain tumours, for which there is yet no definitive cure. Different approaches to treatment have been tried, in vain or with minimal benefit for the patient. In addition to surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, immunotherapy aiming at evoking an inflammatory reaction against the tumour itself has been tried. Immunotherapy has shown good results in an experimental mouse model, but no convincing efficacy/success in patients. Why are the gliomas always winning, how do they take the lead? The following phenomena lead us to propose an hypothesis about the reason for the glioma lead: the reported findings of phagocytic activity in reactive and neoplastic astrocytes in animal models and humans; the frequently observed ingested "non-self material"/debris in glioma cells; the markedly high contents of tumour cells with phagocytic phenotype in gliomas and the signs of only limited and temporary inflammatory reactions in different immunotherapy attempts. Whether it being a true phagocytosis, an engulfing or comparable activity by the glioma cells, contributing to the tumour's self defense against e.g. antitumoural therapies, it should be beneficial to attempt hampering these self defense properties e.g. by blocking their engulfing capacity. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Medical Hypotheses
volume
73
pages
336 - 337
publisher
Churchill Livingstone
external identifiers
  • WOS:000268643900019
  • PMID:19423236
  • Scopus:67649600369
ISSN
1532-2777
DOI
10.1016/j.mehy.2009.03.042
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c5ed53d1-d563-44ff-a7ed-3f0a2c2055bd (old id 1412554)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19423236?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-06-01 11:02:32
date last changed
2017-01-01 08:13:13
@article{c5ed53d1-d563-44ff-a7ed-3f0a2c2055bd,
  abstract     = {Malignant glioma and glioblastoma multiforme form the largest group of highly malignant brain tumours, for which there is yet no definitive cure. Different approaches to treatment have been tried, in vain or with minimal benefit for the patient. In addition to surgery, radiation and chemotherapy, immunotherapy aiming at evoking an inflammatory reaction against the tumour itself has been tried. Immunotherapy has shown good results in an experimental mouse model, but no convincing efficacy/success in patients. Why are the gliomas always winning, how do they take the lead? The following phenomena lead us to propose an hypothesis about the reason for the glioma lead: the reported findings of phagocytic activity in reactive and neoplastic astrocytes in animal models and humans; the frequently observed ingested "non-self material"/debris in glioma cells; the markedly high contents of tumour cells with phagocytic phenotype in gliomas and the signs of only limited and temporary inflammatory reactions in different immunotherapy attempts. Whether it being a true phagocytosis, an engulfing or comparable activity by the glioma cells, contributing to the tumour's self defense against e.g. antitumoural therapies, it should be beneficial to attempt hampering these self defense properties e.g. by blocking their engulfing capacity.},
  author       = {Persson, Annette and Englund, Elisabet},
  issn         = {1532-2777},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {336--337},
  publisher    = {Churchill Livingstone},
  series       = {Medical Hypotheses},
  title        = {The glioma cell edge - winning by engulfing the enemy?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2009.03.042},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {2009},
}