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Pressurized hot water extraction of insecticides from process dust - Comparison with supercritical fluid extraction

Sparr Eskilsson, Cecilia LU ; Hartonen, Kari; Mathiasson, Lennart LU and Riekkola, Marja-Liisa (2004) In Journal of Separation Science 27(1-2). p.59-64
Abstract
Pressurized hot liquid water and steam were used to investigate the possibilities of extracting insecticides (carbofuran, carbosulfan, and imidacloprid) from contaminated process dust remaining from seed-pellet production. Extraction temperature was the most important parameter in influencing the extraction efficiency and rate of extraction, while varying the pressure had no profound effect. A clean-up procedure of the water extracts using solid phase extraction (SPE) was found to be necessary prior to final analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Quantitative extraction (compared to a validated organic solvent extraction method) of imidacloprid was obtained at temperatures of 100-150°C within 30 min extraction time.... (More)
Pressurized hot liquid water and steam were used to investigate the possibilities of extracting insecticides (carbofuran, carbosulfan, and imidacloprid) from contaminated process dust remaining from seed-pellet production. Extraction temperature was the most important parameter in influencing the extraction efficiency and rate of extraction, while varying the pressure had no profound effect. A clean-up procedure of the water extracts using solid phase extraction (SPE) was found to be necessary prior to final analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Quantitative extraction (compared to a validated organic solvent extraction method) of imidacloprid was obtained at temperatures of 100-150°C within 30 min extraction time. Temperatures above 150°C were required to extract carbofuran efficiently. The most non-polar analyte of the investigated compounds, carbosulfan, gave no detectable concentrations with pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE). One reason might be its low solubility in water, and when attempts are made to increase its solubility by increasing the temperature it may degrade to carbofuran. This can explain recovery values above 100% for carbofuran at higher temperatures. A comparison of the PHWE results and those obtained with supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) revealed that PHWE is advantageous for polar compounds, where the solubility of the analyte in water is high enough that lower temperatures can be used. For non-polar compounds carbon dioxide based extraction is preferred unless the target analyte is highly thermostable. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Separation Science
volume
27
issue
1-2
pages
59 - 64
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:15335059
  • wos:000188551400009
  • scopus:0442294236
ISSN
1615-9314
DOI
10.1002/jssc.200301566
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3c25be19-5beb-4d32-9ccb-dfd7c28cf160 (old id 141295)
date added to LUP
2007-06-27 16:01:41
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:45:41
@article{3c25be19-5beb-4d32-9ccb-dfd7c28cf160,
  abstract     = {Pressurized hot liquid water and steam were used to investigate the possibilities of extracting insecticides (carbofuran, carbosulfan, and imidacloprid) from contaminated process dust remaining from seed-pellet production. Extraction temperature was the most important parameter in influencing the extraction efficiency and rate of extraction, while varying the pressure had no profound effect. A clean-up procedure of the water extracts using solid phase extraction (SPE) was found to be necessary prior to final analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Quantitative extraction (compared to a validated organic solvent extraction method) of imidacloprid was obtained at temperatures of 100-150°C within 30 min extraction time. Temperatures above 150°C were required to extract carbofuran efficiently. The most non-polar analyte of the investigated compounds, carbosulfan, gave no detectable concentrations with pressurized hot water extraction (PHWE). One reason might be its low solubility in water, and when attempts are made to increase its solubility by increasing the temperature it may degrade to carbofuran. This can explain recovery values above 100% for carbofuran at higher temperatures. A comparison of the PHWE results and those obtained with supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) revealed that PHWE is advantageous for polar compounds, where the solubility of the analyte in water is high enough that lower temperatures can be used. For non-polar compounds carbon dioxide based extraction is preferred unless the target analyte is highly thermostable.},
  author       = {Sparr Eskilsson, Cecilia and Hartonen, Kari and Mathiasson, Lennart and Riekkola, Marja-Liisa},
  issn         = {1615-9314},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {59--64},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {Journal of Separation Science},
  title        = {Pressurized hot water extraction of insecticides from process dust - Comparison with supercritical fluid extraction},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jssc.200301566},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2004},
}