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Resistin is elevated following traumatic joint injury and causes matrix degradation and release of inflammatory cytokines from articular cartilage in vitro

Lee, J. H.; Ort, T.; Ma, K.; Picha, K.; Carton, J.; Marsters, P. A.; Lohmander, Stefan LU ; Baribaud, F.; Song, X. -Y. R. and Blake, S. (2009) In Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 17(5). p.613-620
Abstract
Objective: Resistin is a secreted factor that is elevated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and believed to drive joint inflammation in vivo. This study was undertaken to determine if resistin is present in the joint following joint injury and to elucidate the role of resistin in cartilage degradation. Methods: The level of resistin was measured in paired synovial fluid (SF) and serum samples from patients following joint injury (anterior cruciate ligament, ACL or meniscus tear). Localization of resistin was visualized by immunohistochemistry of synovial tissue and cartilage from healthy and CA donors. Mouse and human cartilage cultures were used to assess the effect of resistin on cartilage metabolism. Results: In trauma patients, resistin... (More)
Objective: Resistin is a secreted factor that is elevated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and believed to drive joint inflammation in vivo. This study was undertaken to determine if resistin is present in the joint following joint injury and to elucidate the role of resistin in cartilage degradation. Methods: The level of resistin was measured in paired synovial fluid (SF) and serum samples from patients following joint injury (anterior cruciate ligament, ACL or meniscus tear). Localization of resistin was visualized by immunohistochemistry of synovial tissue and cartilage from healthy and CA donors. Mouse and human cartilage cultures were used to assess the effect of resistin on cartilage metabolism. Results: In trauma patients, resistin levels declined with increasing time post injury. The resistin levels were highest in samples collected up to 1 week following traumatic injury (SF: 2980 pg/ml, serum: 7901 pg/ml) and lowest in samples collected 6-26 years post injury (SF: 686 pg/ml, serum: 5682 pg/ml). Resistin was shown to be expressed in macrophage-like cells in both healthy and OA synovial tissue. Treatment of mouse cartilage cultures with recombinant resistin led to a dose dependent loss of proteoglycan and induction of inflammatory cytokine and PGE(2) production. Recombinant resistin inhibited proteoglycan synthesis in human cartilage explants. Conclusion: Resistin is elevated both systemically and locally in the weeks immediately following joint injury and has a direct effect on cartilage matrix turnover and cytokine production. Resistin may play a role in the early stages of trauma-induced CA and may represent a new therapeutic target to slow joint destruction in CA. (C) 2008 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Cytokine, Injury, Osteoarthritis, Resistin, Cartilage
in
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
volume
17
issue
5
pages
613 - 620
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000266139600011
  • scopus:64849117486
ISSN
1063-4584
DOI
10.1016/j.ioca.2008.08.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
12f96608-514f-452b-bfb6-0d682a9c767c (old id 1425551)
date added to LUP
2009-07-01 15:22:14
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:35:52
@article{12f96608-514f-452b-bfb6-0d682a9c767c,
  abstract     = {Objective: Resistin is a secreted factor that is elevated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and believed to drive joint inflammation in vivo. This study was undertaken to determine if resistin is present in the joint following joint injury and to elucidate the role of resistin in cartilage degradation. Methods: The level of resistin was measured in paired synovial fluid (SF) and serum samples from patients following joint injury (anterior cruciate ligament, ACL or meniscus tear). Localization of resistin was visualized by immunohistochemistry of synovial tissue and cartilage from healthy and CA donors. Mouse and human cartilage cultures were used to assess the effect of resistin on cartilage metabolism. Results: In trauma patients, resistin levels declined with increasing time post injury. The resistin levels were highest in samples collected up to 1 week following traumatic injury (SF: 2980 pg/ml, serum: 7901 pg/ml) and lowest in samples collected 6-26 years post injury (SF: 686 pg/ml, serum: 5682 pg/ml). Resistin was shown to be expressed in macrophage-like cells in both healthy and OA synovial tissue. Treatment of mouse cartilage cultures with recombinant resistin led to a dose dependent loss of proteoglycan and induction of inflammatory cytokine and PGE(2) production. Recombinant resistin inhibited proteoglycan synthesis in human cartilage explants. Conclusion: Resistin is elevated both systemically and locally in the weeks immediately following joint injury and has a direct effect on cartilage matrix turnover and cytokine production. Resistin may play a role in the early stages of trauma-induced CA and may represent a new therapeutic target to slow joint destruction in CA. (C) 2008 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Lee, J. H. and Ort, T. and Ma, K. and Picha, K. and Carton, J. and Marsters, P. A. and Lohmander, Stefan and Baribaud, F. and Song, X. -Y. R. and Blake, S.},
  issn         = {1063-4584},
  keyword      = {Cytokine,Injury,Osteoarthritis,Resistin,Cartilage},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {613--620},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Osteoarthritis and Cartilage},
  title        = {Resistin is elevated following traumatic joint injury and causes matrix degradation and release of inflammatory cytokines from articular cartilage in vitro},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ioca.2008.08.007},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2009},
}