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Change detection in newborns using a multiple deviant paradigm: A study using magnetoencephalography

Sambeth, Anke; Pakarinen, Satu; Ruohio, Katja; Fellman, Vineta LU ; van Zuijen, Titia L. and Huotilainen, Minna (2009) In Clinical Neurophysiology 120(3). p.530-538
Abstract
Objective: Mismatch responses are elicited to changes in sound streams in healthy newborns. In the ideal case, these responses can predict cognitive problems later in life. We employed a multiple deviant paradigm for a fast assessment of the ability of the newborn brain to respond to various types of acoustic changes. Methods: In 12 healthy newborns, we recorded all electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram while presenting auditory stimuli. Between repeated stimuli, four types of acoustic changes (frequency intensity, duration, and a gap) were presented, varying in deviance magnitude. Results: One major response was present in the neonatal evoked potentials and fields at 250-260 ms. Magnetic mismatch responses were elicited to... (More)
Objective: Mismatch responses are elicited to changes in sound streams in healthy newborns. In the ideal case, these responses can predict cognitive problems later in life. We employed a multiple deviant paradigm for a fast assessment of the ability of the newborn brain to respond to various types of acoustic changes. Methods: In 12 healthy newborns, we recorded all electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram while presenting auditory stimuli. Between repeated stimuli, four types of acoustic changes (frequency intensity, duration, and a gap) were presented, varying in deviance magnitude. Results: One major response was present in the neonatal evoked potentials and fields at 250-260 ms. Magnetic mismatch responses were elicited to all change types except for the duration deviant and they were positive in polarity. The frequency deviant elicited more positive EEG amplitudes than the standard, whereas the response to the duration deviant was more negative. Conclusions: These results show that newborns can detect changes to at least four types of deviances within a Sound stream. Furthermore, the use of magneto- and electroencephalography is complementary in newborns, since the methods may reveal different outcomes. Significance: Further studies are warranted to determine whether the present study design can play a role in testing auditory function in clinical infant populations. (C) 2009 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Newborn, Mismatch negativity (MMN), Change detection, Magnetoencephalography, Oddball, Sound discrimination
in
Clinical Neurophysiology
volume
120
issue
3
pages
530 - 538
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000265772400012
  • scopus:62949156029
ISSN
1872-8952
DOI
10.1016/j.clinph.2008.12.033
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
07fdb2ad-58c2-44ba-879c-bb695ad9cfc8 (old id 1426390)
date added to LUP
2009-06-29 14:42:54
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:39:39
@article{07fdb2ad-58c2-44ba-879c-bb695ad9cfc8,
  abstract     = {Objective: Mismatch responses are elicited to changes in sound streams in healthy newborns. In the ideal case, these responses can predict cognitive problems later in life. We employed a multiple deviant paradigm for a fast assessment of the ability of the newborn brain to respond to various types of acoustic changes. Methods: In 12 healthy newborns, we recorded all electroencephalogram (EEG) and magnetoencephalogram while presenting auditory stimuli. Between repeated stimuli, four types of acoustic changes (frequency intensity, duration, and a gap) were presented, varying in deviance magnitude. Results: One major response was present in the neonatal evoked potentials and fields at 250-260 ms. Magnetic mismatch responses were elicited to all change types except for the duration deviant and they were positive in polarity. The frequency deviant elicited more positive EEG amplitudes than the standard, whereas the response to the duration deviant was more negative. Conclusions: These results show that newborns can detect changes to at least four types of deviances within a Sound stream. Furthermore, the use of magneto- and electroencephalography is complementary in newborns, since the methods may reveal different outcomes. Significance: Further studies are warranted to determine whether the present study design can play a role in testing auditory function in clinical infant populations. (C) 2009 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Sambeth, Anke and Pakarinen, Satu and Ruohio, Katja and Fellman, Vineta and van Zuijen, Titia L. and Huotilainen, Minna},
  issn         = {1872-8952},
  keyword      = {Newborn,Mismatch negativity (MMN),Change detection,Magnetoencephalography,Oddball,Sound discrimination},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {530--538},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Clinical Neurophysiology},
  title        = {Change detection in newborns using a multiple deviant paradigm: A study using magnetoencephalography},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2008.12.033},
  volume       = {120},
  year         = {2009},
}