Skip to main content

Lund University Publications

LUND UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

No evidence of intrauterine transmission of hepatitis A virus from a mother to a premature infant.

Selander, Bo LU ; Bläckberg, Jonas LU ; Widell, Anders LU and Johansson, Hugo LU (2009) In Acta paediatrica 98. p.1603-1606
Abstract
Aim: To determine whether or not an intrauterine transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV) occurred from an infected mother to her premature infant delivered by caesarean section. Methods: The mother and her child were tested for HAV by serology and reverse transcription PCR. Results: An outbreak of HAV infection was seen among children and a 33-year-old day-care teacher, pregnant in third trimester, at a day-care centre in southern Sweden. Due to premature labour and diminished foetal movements a caesarean section was performed and a premature girl in gestational weeks 33 +1 was born. During the 3-week postnatal hospitalization period the child presented no clinical symptoms of HAV infection and anti-HAV IgM antibodies remained undetectable... (More)
Aim: To determine whether or not an intrauterine transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV) occurred from an infected mother to her premature infant delivered by caesarean section. Methods: The mother and her child were tested for HAV by serology and reverse transcription PCR. Results: An outbreak of HAV infection was seen among children and a 33-year-old day-care teacher, pregnant in third trimester, at a day-care centre in southern Sweden. Due to premature labour and diminished foetal movements a caesarean section was performed and a premature girl in gestational weeks 33 +1 was born. During the 3-week postnatal hospitalization period the child presented no clinical symptoms of HAV infection and anti-HAV IgM antibodies remained undetectable at day 14 and 109 after birth. Furthermore HAV RNA remained undetectable by reverse transcription PCR in the child's blood at birth and in throat and faeces for the first 3 and 4 weeks of life respectively. HAV RNA in the mother's blood was detected at 6 days prior to and at 17 days after delivery. HAV RNA was undetectable in breast milk when tested on day 3 after delivery. Conclusion: The study shows that it is not possible to obtain reliable BFI data, which reflect changes in CBF after acetazolamide infusion, using the CW-NIRS and ICG method. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; and
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta paediatrica
volume
98
pages
1603 - 1606
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000269491100015
  • pmid:19558626
  • scopus:69749116198
  • pmid:19558626
ISSN
1651-2227
DOI
10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01402.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
additional info
The information about affiliations in this record was updated in December 2015. The record was previously connected to the following departments: Division of Medical Microbiology (013250400), Division of Infection Medicine (SUS) (013008000), Clinical Microbiology, Malmö (013011000), Paediatrics (Lund) (013002000)
id
104afaca-8dec-49cf-813f-77514044c6b1 (old id 1433816)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19558626?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2016-04-04 09:20:27
date last changed
2021-08-04 05:20:11
@article{104afaca-8dec-49cf-813f-77514044c6b1,
  abstract     = {Aim: To determine whether or not an intrauterine transmission of hepatitis A virus (HAV) occurred from an infected mother to her premature infant delivered by caesarean section. Methods: The mother and her child were tested for HAV by serology and reverse transcription PCR. Results: An outbreak of HAV infection was seen among children and a 33-year-old day-care teacher, pregnant in third trimester, at a day-care centre in southern Sweden. Due to premature labour and diminished foetal movements a caesarean section was performed and a premature girl in gestational weeks 33 +1 was born. During the 3-week postnatal hospitalization period the child presented no clinical symptoms of HAV infection and anti-HAV IgM antibodies remained undetectable at day 14 and 109 after birth. Furthermore HAV RNA remained undetectable by reverse transcription PCR in the child's blood at birth and in throat and faeces for the first 3 and 4 weeks of life respectively. HAV RNA in the mother's blood was detected at 6 days prior to and at 17 days after delivery. HAV RNA was undetectable in breast milk when tested on day 3 after delivery. Conclusion: The study shows that it is not possible to obtain reliable BFI data, which reflect changes in CBF after acetazolamide infusion, using the CW-NIRS and ICG method.},
  author       = {Selander, Bo and Bläckberg, Jonas and Widell, Anders and Johansson, Hugo},
  issn         = {1651-2227},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1603--1606},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta paediatrica},
  title        = {No evidence of intrauterine transmission of hepatitis A virus from a mother to a premature infant.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01402.x},
  doi          = {10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01402.x},
  volume       = {98},
  year         = {2009},
}