Advanced

How common are psychotic and bipolar disorders? A 50-year follow-up of the Lundby population.

Bogren, Mats LU ; Mattisson, Cecilia LU ; Isberg, Per-Erik LU and Nettelbladt, Per LU (2009) In Nordic Journal of Psychiatry 63. p.336-346
Abstract
Background: The purpose was to present the prevalence of all psychotic and bipolar (BP) disorders in a total general population (n=3563), which has been followed from 1947 to 1997. Materials and Methods: Best-estimate consensus DSM-IV diagnoses, supported by data from interviews, case notes, registers and key-informants, were assessed. The period prevalence from 1947 to 1997 and the lifetime prevalence (LTP) in 1997, respectively, was calculated. Results: The period prevalence per 100 was: 4.24 for any psychotic or BP disorder, 2.25 for non-affective psychotic (NAP) disorder, 0.76 for psychotic disorder related to a general medical condition (GMC), 0.62 for affective psychotic (AP) disorder and 0.59 for substance-induced psychotic (SIP)... (More)
Background: The purpose was to present the prevalence of all psychotic and bipolar (BP) disorders in a total general population (n=3563), which has been followed from 1947 to 1997. Materials and Methods: Best-estimate consensus DSM-IV diagnoses, supported by data from interviews, case notes, registers and key-informants, were assessed. The period prevalence from 1947 to 1997 and the lifetime prevalence (LTP) in 1997, respectively, was calculated. Results: The period prevalence per 100 was: 4.24 for any psychotic or BP disorder, 2.25 for non-affective psychotic (NAP) disorder, 0.76 for psychotic disorder related to a general medical condition (GMC), 0.62 for affective psychotic (AP) disorder and 0.59 for substance-induced psychotic (SIP) disorder. The LTP per 100 was: 2.82 for any psychotic or BP disorder, 1.38 for NAP disorder, 0.54 for psychotic disorder related to a GMC, 0.48 for SIP disorder and 0.42 for AP disorder. The specific diagnosis with the highest period prevalence 1.43 per 100 and LTP 0.84 per 100, respectively, was schizophrenia. The LTP of psychotic disorder related to a GMC, SIP disorder, schizophrenia and delusional disorder, respectively, was higher than in most recent community studies while the LTP of brief psychotic disorder, schizophreniform disorder and AP disorder, respectively, was lower. However, the findings were in approximate accord with the estimates in the Psychoses in Finland (PIF) Study 1. Conclusions: The findings suggest that psychotic disorders are common in the community, and should be considered a major public health concern. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Prevalence, Psychotic disorders, Epidemiology, Community study, Bipolar disorders
in
Nordic Journal of Psychiatry
volume
63
pages
336 - 346
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • wos:000269602400011
  • pmid:19492244
  • scopus:70349137111
ISSN
1502-4725
DOI
10.1080/08039480903009118
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4d65ec38-49b7-42ed-97e4-0b99fc60cca0 (old id 1434579)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19492244?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-07-01 16:56:10
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:36:39
@article{4d65ec38-49b7-42ed-97e4-0b99fc60cca0,
  abstract     = {Background: The purpose was to present the prevalence of all psychotic and bipolar (BP) disorders in a total general population (n=3563), which has been followed from 1947 to 1997. Materials and Methods: Best-estimate consensus DSM-IV diagnoses, supported by data from interviews, case notes, registers and key-informants, were assessed. The period prevalence from 1947 to 1997 and the lifetime prevalence (LTP) in 1997, respectively, was calculated. Results: The period prevalence per 100 was: 4.24 for any psychotic or BP disorder, 2.25 for non-affective psychotic (NAP) disorder, 0.76 for psychotic disorder related to a general medical condition (GMC), 0.62 for affective psychotic (AP) disorder and 0.59 for substance-induced psychotic (SIP) disorder. The LTP per 100 was: 2.82 for any psychotic or BP disorder, 1.38 for NAP disorder, 0.54 for psychotic disorder related to a GMC, 0.48 for SIP disorder and 0.42 for AP disorder. The specific diagnosis with the highest period prevalence 1.43 per 100 and LTP 0.84 per 100, respectively, was schizophrenia. The LTP of psychotic disorder related to a GMC, SIP disorder, schizophrenia and delusional disorder, respectively, was higher than in most recent community studies while the LTP of brief psychotic disorder, schizophreniform disorder and AP disorder, respectively, was lower. However, the findings were in approximate accord with the estimates in the Psychoses in Finland (PIF) Study 1. Conclusions: The findings suggest that psychotic disorders are common in the community, and should be considered a major public health concern.},
  author       = {Bogren, Mats and Mattisson, Cecilia and Isberg, Per-Erik and Nettelbladt, Per},
  issn         = {1502-4725},
  keyword      = {Prevalence,Psychotic disorders,Epidemiology,Community study,Bipolar disorders},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {336--346},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Nordic Journal of Psychiatry},
  title        = {How common are psychotic and bipolar disorders? A 50-year follow-up of the Lundby population.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/08039480903009118},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2009},
}