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Body mass index and breast cancer survival in relation to the introduction of mammographic screening.

Olsson, A; Garne, J P; Tengrup, Ingrid LU ; Zackrisson, Sophia LU and Manjer, Jonas LU (2009) In European Journal of Surgical Oncology 35. p.1261-1267
Abstract
AIMS: Mammographic screening reduces mortality in breast cancer. It is not known if this reduction is more pronounced in certain groups. Obesity has been associated with worse survival following breast cancer diagnosis. This study investigates BMI in relation to breast cancer mortality, and if this association is affected by invitation to mammographic screening. METHODS: In 1976, a randomised mammographic screening trial, inviting 50% of all women aged 45-69 years (n=42 283), was set up in Malmö, Sweden. BMI in relation to breast cancer mortality was examined separately in women invited or not invited to screening in the trial. The analyses also included a historical control-group diagnosed before the screening trial. The study included... (More)
AIMS: Mammographic screening reduces mortality in breast cancer. It is not known if this reduction is more pronounced in certain groups. Obesity has been associated with worse survival following breast cancer diagnosis. This study investigates BMI in relation to breast cancer mortality, and if this association is affected by invitation to mammographic screening. METHODS: In 1976, a randomised mammographic screening trial, inviting 50% of all women aged 45-69 years (n=42 283), was set up in Malmö, Sweden. BMI in relation to breast cancer mortality was examined separately in women invited or not invited to screening in the trial. The analyses also included a historical control-group diagnosed before the screening trial. The study included 2974 women diagnosed in 1961-1991. Relative risks (RR) with a 95% confidence interval was obtained from a Cox proportional hazard analysis and in the analysis of all women, follow-up was limited to 10 years. RESULTS: Obese women (BMI>/=30) not invited to mammographic screening had a higher adjusted RR of dying of breast cancer as compared to normal weight women (2.08:1.13-3.81) in the 10-year follow-up. In women invited to screening there was no association between BMI and breast cancer mortality. In the historical control group, mortality was increased in overweight women (BMI: 25-30), RR=1.27:0.99-1.62, and obese women, RR=1.32:0.94-1.84, but these associations totally disappeared in the multivariate analysis, following adjustment for tumour size and stage. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obese women may be a group that profit from mammographic screening to more than normal weight women. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Surgical Oncology
volume
35
pages
1261 - 1267
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000272574600005
  • pmid:19481409
  • scopus:70449121805
ISSN
1532-2157
DOI
10.1016/j.ejso.2009.04.012
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a45b0324-af5e-4c4a-b10b-c74106f0bd2b (old id 1434708)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19481409?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-07-01 11:31:45
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:37:14
@article{a45b0324-af5e-4c4a-b10b-c74106f0bd2b,
  abstract     = {AIMS: Mammographic screening reduces mortality in breast cancer. It is not known if this reduction is more pronounced in certain groups. Obesity has been associated with worse survival following breast cancer diagnosis. This study investigates BMI in relation to breast cancer mortality, and if this association is affected by invitation to mammographic screening. METHODS: In 1976, a randomised mammographic screening trial, inviting 50% of all women aged 45-69 years (n=42 283), was set up in Malmö, Sweden. BMI in relation to breast cancer mortality was examined separately in women invited or not invited to screening in the trial. The analyses also included a historical control-group diagnosed before the screening trial. The study included 2974 women diagnosed in 1961-1991. Relative risks (RR) with a 95% confidence interval was obtained from a Cox proportional hazard analysis and in the analysis of all women, follow-up was limited to 10 years. RESULTS: Obese women (BMI>/=30) not invited to mammographic screening had a higher adjusted RR of dying of breast cancer as compared to normal weight women (2.08:1.13-3.81) in the 10-year follow-up. In women invited to screening there was no association between BMI and breast cancer mortality. In the historical control group, mortality was increased in overweight women (BMI: 25-30), RR=1.27:0.99-1.62, and obese women, RR=1.32:0.94-1.84, but these associations totally disappeared in the multivariate analysis, following adjustment for tumour size and stage. CONCLUSIONS: Overweight and obese women may be a group that profit from mammographic screening to more than normal weight women.},
  author       = {Olsson, A and Garne, J P and Tengrup, Ingrid and Zackrisson, Sophia and Manjer, Jonas},
  issn         = {1532-2157},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1261--1267},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Journal of Surgical Oncology},
  title        = {Body mass index and breast cancer survival in relation to the introduction of mammographic screening.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejso.2009.04.012},
  volume       = {35},
  year         = {2009},
}