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The association of meniscal damage with joint effusion in persons without radiographic osteoarthritis: the Framingham and MOST osteoarthritis studies

Roemer, F. W.; Guermazi, A.; Hunter, D. J.; Niu, J.; Zhang, Y.; Englund, Martin LU ; Javaid, M. K.; Lynch, J. A.; Mohr, A. and Torner, J., et al. (2009) In Osteoarthritis and Cartilage 17(6). p.748-753
Abstract
Objective: To assess the cross-sectional association between meniscal status and joint effusion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in knees without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). Design: Knees without OA (Kellgren/Lawrence grade 0) from the Framingham and MOST studies were examined by MRI. Meniscal status was assessed with a score of 0-4 in the anterior horn/body/posterior horn of the medial/lateral meniscus and effusion was assessed using a score of 0-3. The odds ratios (ORs) of joint effusion in those with meniscal damage were estimated using a logistic regression model. A sub-analysis was performed for knees without MRI-detected cartilage damage. Results: Of 1368 knees, 296 (21.6%) showed meniscal pathology in at least one... (More)
Objective: To assess the cross-sectional association between meniscal status and joint effusion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in knees without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). Design: Knees without OA (Kellgren/Lawrence grade 0) from the Framingham and MOST studies were examined by MRI. Meniscal status was assessed with a score of 0-4 in the anterior horn/body/posterior horn of the medial/lateral meniscus and effusion was assessed using a score of 0-3. The odds ratios (ORs) of joint effusion in those with meniscal damage were estimated using a logistic regression model. A sub-analysis was performed for knees without MRI-detected cartilage damage. Results: Of 1368 knees, 296 (21.6%) showed meniscal pathology in at least one subregion. Effusion was present in 133 (44.9%) of knees with meniscal damage vs 328 (30.6%) in those without meniscal damage. The adjusted OR of effusion in a knee with meniscal damage was 1.8, 95% confidence intervals (CI) [1.4, 2.4]. The OR of effusion for the group with meniscal pathology in two compartments was 5.4, 95% CI [2.1, 14.3]. For knees without any cartilage lesions but with meniscal damage in any compartment the OR was 2.3, 95% CI [1.1, 4.5]. Conclusions: Knees without OA but with meniscal pathology exhibit joint effusion to a significantly higher degree than knees without meniscal damage. The association persists for knees without cartilage damage. The prevalence of effusion is further increased when present in two compartments. Concomitant occurrence of synovial activation and meniscal damage contributes to understanding the pathophysiology of early degenerative joint disease. (C) 2008 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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published
subject
keywords
Meniscal tear, Magnetic resonance imaging, Effusion, Osteoarthritis, Knee, Synovium
in
Osteoarthritis and Cartilage
volume
17
issue
6
pages
748 - 753
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000267194400008
  • scopus:67349159052
ISSN
1063-4584
DOI
10.1016/j.joca.2008.09.013
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
697cbdb6-02d4-4198-8ce9-3c67e8705749 (old id 1441176)
date added to LUP
2009-07-28 11:00:59
date last changed
2017-11-12 03:25:23
@article{697cbdb6-02d4-4198-8ce9-3c67e8705749,
  abstract     = {Objective: To assess the cross-sectional association between meniscal status and joint effusion on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in knees without radiographic osteoarthritis (OA). Design: Knees without OA (Kellgren/Lawrence grade 0) from the Framingham and MOST studies were examined by MRI. Meniscal status was assessed with a score of 0-4 in the anterior horn/body/posterior horn of the medial/lateral meniscus and effusion was assessed using a score of 0-3. The odds ratios (ORs) of joint effusion in those with meniscal damage were estimated using a logistic regression model. A sub-analysis was performed for knees without MRI-detected cartilage damage. Results: Of 1368 knees, 296 (21.6%) showed meniscal pathology in at least one subregion. Effusion was present in 133 (44.9%) of knees with meniscal damage vs 328 (30.6%) in those without meniscal damage. The adjusted OR of effusion in a knee with meniscal damage was 1.8, 95% confidence intervals (CI) [1.4, 2.4]. The OR of effusion for the group with meniscal pathology in two compartments was 5.4, 95% CI [2.1, 14.3]. For knees without any cartilage lesions but with meniscal damage in any compartment the OR was 2.3, 95% CI [1.1, 4.5]. Conclusions: Knees without OA but with meniscal pathology exhibit joint effusion to a significantly higher degree than knees without meniscal damage. The association persists for knees without cartilage damage. The prevalence of effusion is further increased when present in two compartments. Concomitant occurrence of synovial activation and meniscal damage contributes to understanding the pathophysiology of early degenerative joint disease. (C) 2008 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Roemer, F. W. and Guermazi, A. and Hunter, D. J. and Niu, J. and Zhang, Y. and Englund, Martin and Javaid, M. K. and Lynch, J. A. and Mohr, A. and Torner, J. and Lewis, C. E. and Nevitt, M. C. and Felson, D. T.},
  issn         = {1063-4584},
  keyword      = {Meniscal tear,Magnetic resonance imaging,Effusion,Osteoarthritis,Knee,Synovium},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {748--753},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Osteoarthritis and Cartilage},
  title        = {The association of meniscal damage with joint effusion in persons without radiographic osteoarthritis: the Framingham and MOST osteoarthritis studies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.joca.2008.09.013},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2009},
}