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Allergic contact dermatitis caused by isobornyl acrylate in the Enlite glucose sensor and the Paradigm MiniMed Quick-set insulin infusion set

Herman, Anne; Baeck, Marie; de Montjoye, Laurence; Bruze, Magnus LU ; Giertz, Emil; Goossens, An and Mowitz, Martin LU (2019) In Contact Dermatitis
Abstract

Background: The FreeStyle Libre glucose sensor has caused many cases of allergic contact dermatitis, and isobornyl acrylate (IBOA) in this sensor has been identified as one of the culprit allergens. Objectives: To report on the presence of IBOA in devices produced by Medtronic, namely, Enlite sensor and insulin infusion set Paradigm MiniMed Quick-set. Patients and Methods: Five patients reacting to the glucose sensor Enlite and/or the insulin infusion set Paradigm MiniMed Quick-set observed in three clinics (two Belgian and one Swedish) were patch tested with the baseline and other series, as well as with IBOA; four of them also with pieces of adhesive patches from the devices, and two with a thin layer chromatogram of Enlite glucose... (More)

Background: The FreeStyle Libre glucose sensor has caused many cases of allergic contact dermatitis, and isobornyl acrylate (IBOA) in this sensor has been identified as one of the culprit allergens. Objectives: To report on the presence of IBOA in devices produced by Medtronic, namely, Enlite sensor and insulin infusion set Paradigm MiniMed Quick-set. Patients and Methods: Five patients reacting to the glucose sensor Enlite and/or the insulin infusion set Paradigm MiniMed Quick-set observed in three clinics (two Belgian and one Swedish) were patch tested with the baseline and other series, as well as with IBOA; four of them also with pieces of adhesive patches from the devices, and two with a thin layer chromatogram of Enlite glucose sensor extracts. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses were performed. Results: Four patients reacted to IBOA and one to colophonium, a known allergen in Enlite, and three to the adhesive part of the sensor or the insulin infusion set. IBOA was identified in the sensor by GC-MS, and its presence was indicated in the infusion set. Conclusions: IBOA is a contact allergen in Enlite glucose sensor, and likely also in the infusion set. Therefore, these devices are not suitable alternatives for patients sensitized to the FreeStyle Libre sensor.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
acrylates, allergic contact dermatitis, delayed hypersensitivity, glucose sensor, insulin pump, isobornyl acrylate, medical device
in
Contact Dermatitis
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85071276984
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/cod.13374
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1441322b-0395-4cd1-a6c2-f9469a63fc30
date added to LUP
2019-09-05 15:14:45
date last changed
2019-10-01 03:46:50
@article{1441322b-0395-4cd1-a6c2-f9469a63fc30,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: The FreeStyle Libre glucose sensor has caused many cases of allergic contact dermatitis, and isobornyl acrylate (IBOA) in this sensor has been identified as one of the culprit allergens. Objectives: To report on the presence of IBOA in devices produced by Medtronic, namely, Enlite sensor and insulin infusion set Paradigm MiniMed Quick-set. Patients and Methods: Five patients reacting to the glucose sensor Enlite and/or the insulin infusion set Paradigm MiniMed Quick-set observed in three clinics (two Belgian and one Swedish) were patch tested with the baseline and other series, as well as with IBOA; four of them also with pieces of adhesive patches from the devices, and two with a thin layer chromatogram of Enlite glucose sensor extracts. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses were performed. Results: Four patients reacted to IBOA and one to colophonium, a known allergen in Enlite, and three to the adhesive part of the sensor or the insulin infusion set. IBOA was identified in the sensor by GC-MS, and its presence was indicated in the infusion set. Conclusions: IBOA is a contact allergen in Enlite glucose sensor, and likely also in the infusion set. Therefore, these devices are not suitable alternatives for patients sensitized to the FreeStyle Libre sensor.</p>},
  author       = {Herman, Anne and Baeck, Marie and de Montjoye, Laurence and Bruze, Magnus and Giertz, Emil and Goossens, An and Mowitz, Martin},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  keyword      = {acrylates,allergic contact dermatitis,delayed hypersensitivity,glucose sensor,insulin pump,isobornyl acrylate,medical device},
  language     = {eng},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Allergic contact dermatitis caused by isobornyl acrylate in the Enlite glucose sensor and the Paradigm MiniMed Quick-set insulin infusion set},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cod.13374},
  year         = {2019},
}