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Ecosystem thresholds with hypoxia

Conley, Daniel LU ; Carstensen, Jacob; Vaquer-Sunyer, Raquel and Duarte, Carlos M. (2009) 2nd International Symposium on Research and Management of Eutrophication in Coastal Ecosystems In Hydrobiologia 629(1). p.21-29
Abstract
Hypoxia is one of the common effects of eutrophication in coastal marine ecosystems and is becoming an increasingly prevalent problem worldwide. The causes of hypoxia are associated with excess nutrient inputs from both point and non-point sources, although the response of coastal marine ecosystems is strongly modulated by physical processes such as stratification and mixing. Changes in climate, particularly temperature, may also affect the susceptibility of coastal marine ecosystems to hypoxia. Hypoxia is a particularly severe disturbance because it causes death of biota and catastrophic changes in the ecosystem. Bottom water oxygen deficiency not only influences the habitat of living resources but also the biogeochemical processes that... (More)
Hypoxia is one of the common effects of eutrophication in coastal marine ecosystems and is becoming an increasingly prevalent problem worldwide. The causes of hypoxia are associated with excess nutrient inputs from both point and non-point sources, although the response of coastal marine ecosystems is strongly modulated by physical processes such as stratification and mixing. Changes in climate, particularly temperature, may also affect the susceptibility of coastal marine ecosystems to hypoxia. Hypoxia is a particularly severe disturbance because it causes death of biota and catastrophic changes in the ecosystem. Bottom water oxygen deficiency not only influences the habitat of living resources but also the biogeochemical processes that control nutrient concentrations in the water column. Increased phosphorus fluxes from sediments into overlying waters occur with hypoxia. In addition, reductions in the ability of ecosystems to remove nitrogen through denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation may be related to hypoxia and could lead to acceleration in the rate of eutrophication. Three large coastal marine ecosystems (Chesapeake Bay, Northern Gulf of Mexico, and Danish Straits) all demonstrate thresholds whereby repeated hypoxic events have led to an increase in susceptibility of further hypoxia and accelerated eutrophication. Once hypoxia occurs, reoccurrence is likely and may be difficult to reverse. Therefore, elucidating ecosystem thresholds of hypoxia and linking them to nutrient inputs are necessary for the management of coastal marine ecosystems. Finally, projected increases in warming show an increase in the susceptibility of coastal marine ecosystems to hypoxia such that hypoxia will expand. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Biogeochemistry, Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Resilience, Regime shift, Hypoxia
in
Hydrobiologia
volume
629
issue
1
pages
21 - 29
publisher
Springer
conference name
2nd International Symposium on Research and Management of Eutrophication in Coastal Ecosystems
external identifiers
  • wos:000267030400003
  • scopus:67349220013
ISSN
0018-8158
1573-5117
DOI
10.1007/s10750-009-9764-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
994b25fe-9926-45a8-9b0e-6f5d75aa1dd5 (old id 1441685)
date added to LUP
2009-07-27 15:21:53
date last changed
2017-07-30 03:39:55
@inproceedings{994b25fe-9926-45a8-9b0e-6f5d75aa1dd5,
  abstract     = {Hypoxia is one of the common effects of eutrophication in coastal marine ecosystems and is becoming an increasingly prevalent problem worldwide. The causes of hypoxia are associated with excess nutrient inputs from both point and non-point sources, although the response of coastal marine ecosystems is strongly modulated by physical processes such as stratification and mixing. Changes in climate, particularly temperature, may also affect the susceptibility of coastal marine ecosystems to hypoxia. Hypoxia is a particularly severe disturbance because it causes death of biota and catastrophic changes in the ecosystem. Bottom water oxygen deficiency not only influences the habitat of living resources but also the biogeochemical processes that control nutrient concentrations in the water column. Increased phosphorus fluxes from sediments into overlying waters occur with hypoxia. In addition, reductions in the ability of ecosystems to remove nitrogen through denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation may be related to hypoxia and could lead to acceleration in the rate of eutrophication. Three large coastal marine ecosystems (Chesapeake Bay, Northern Gulf of Mexico, and Danish Straits) all demonstrate thresholds whereby repeated hypoxic events have led to an increase in susceptibility of further hypoxia and accelerated eutrophication. Once hypoxia occurs, reoccurrence is likely and may be difficult to reverse. Therefore, elucidating ecosystem thresholds of hypoxia and linking them to nutrient inputs are necessary for the management of coastal marine ecosystems. Finally, projected increases in warming show an increase in the susceptibility of coastal marine ecosystems to hypoxia such that hypoxia will expand.},
  author       = {Conley, Daniel and Carstensen, Jacob and Vaquer-Sunyer, Raquel and Duarte, Carlos M.},
  booktitle    = {Hydrobiologia},
  issn         = {0018-8158},
  keyword      = {Biogeochemistry,Nitrogen,Phosphorus,Resilience,Regime shift,Hypoxia},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {21--29},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  title        = {Ecosystem thresholds with hypoxia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10750-009-9764-2},
  volume       = {629},
  year         = {2009},
}