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The Bloodgen Project of the European Union, 2003-2009

Avent, Neil D.; Martinez, Antonio; Flegel, Willy A.; Olsson, Martin L LU ; Scott, Marion L.; Nogues, Nuria; Pisacka, Martin; Daniels, Geoff L.; Muniz-Diaz, Eduardo and Madgett, Tracey E., et al. (2009) In Transfusion Medicine and Hemotherapy 36(3). p.162-167
Abstract
The Bloodgen project was funded by the European Commission between 2003 and 2006, and involved academic blood centres, universities, and Progenika Biopharma S. A., a commercial supplier of genotyping platforms that incorporate glass arrays. The project has led to the development of a commercially available product, BLOODchip, that can be used to comprehensively genotype an individual for all clinically significant blood groups. The intention of making this system available is that blood services and perhaps even hospital blood banks would be able to obtain extended information concerning the blood group of routine blood donors and vulnerable patient groups. This may be of significant use in the current management of multi-transfused... (More)
The Bloodgen project was funded by the European Commission between 2003 and 2006, and involved academic blood centres, universities, and Progenika Biopharma S. A., a commercial supplier of genotyping platforms that incorporate glass arrays. The project has led to the development of a commercially available product, BLOODchip, that can be used to comprehensively genotype an individual for all clinically significant blood groups. The intention of making this system available is that blood services and perhaps even hospital blood banks would be able to obtain extended information concerning the blood group of routine blood donors and vulnerable patient groups. This may be of significant use in the current management of multi-transfused patients who become alloimmunised due to incomplete matching of blood groups. In the future it can be envisaged that better matching of donor-patient blood could be achieved by comprehensive genotyping of every blood donor, especially regular ones. This situation could even be extended to genotyping every individual at birth, which may prove to have significant long-term health economic benefits as it may be coupled with detection of inborn errors of metabolism. (Less)
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organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
BLOODchip, Blood group antigens, Blood groups
in
Transfusion Medicine and Hemotherapy
volume
36
issue
3
pages
162 - 167
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000266883700003
  • scopus:67650242158
ISSN
1660-3818
DOI
10.1159/000218192
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1096c99f-cae7-488d-a274-110a36656e11 (old id 1441829)
date added to LUP
2009-07-27 15:15:54
date last changed
2017-08-27 03:54:29
@article{1096c99f-cae7-488d-a274-110a36656e11,
  abstract     = {The Bloodgen project was funded by the European Commission between 2003 and 2006, and involved academic blood centres, universities, and Progenika Biopharma S. A., a commercial supplier of genotyping platforms that incorporate glass arrays. The project has led to the development of a commercially available product, BLOODchip, that can be used to comprehensively genotype an individual for all clinically significant blood groups. The intention of making this system available is that blood services and perhaps even hospital blood banks would be able to obtain extended information concerning the blood group of routine blood donors and vulnerable patient groups. This may be of significant use in the current management of multi-transfused patients who become alloimmunised due to incomplete matching of blood groups. In the future it can be envisaged that better matching of donor-patient blood could be achieved by comprehensive genotyping of every blood donor, especially regular ones. This situation could even be extended to genotyping every individual at birth, which may prove to have significant long-term health economic benefits as it may be coupled with detection of inborn errors of metabolism.},
  author       = {Avent, Neil D. and Martinez, Antonio and Flegel, Willy A. and Olsson, Martin L and Scott, Marion L. and Nogues, Nuria and Pisacka, Martin and Daniels, Geoff L. and Muniz-Diaz, Eduardo and Madgett, Tracey E. and Storry, Jill and Beiboer, Sigrid and Maaskant-van Wijkh, Petra M. and von Zabern, Inge and Jimenez, Elisa and Tejedor, Diego and Lopez, Monica and Camacho, Emma and Cheroutre, Goedele and Hacker, Anita and Jinoch, Pavel and Svobodova, Irena and van der Schoot, Ellen and de Haas, Masja},
  issn         = {1660-3818},
  keyword      = {BLOODchip,Blood group antigens,Blood groups},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {162--167},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Transfusion Medicine and Hemotherapy},
  title        = {The Bloodgen Project of the European Union, 2003-2009},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000218192},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2009},
}