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Space-saving advantage of an inverted retina.

Kröger, Ronald LU and Biehlmaier, Oliver (2009) In Vision Research 49(18). p.2318-2321
Abstract
Vertebrate eyes are of the simple or camera type with a single optical system that creates an image on the retina in the back of the eye. There, the visual information is encoded as nervous signals by photoreceptors, processed by retinal neurons, and then sent to the brain via the optic nerve. Surprisingly at first sight, the retinal neurons are located between the lens and the light-sensitive parts of the photoreceptors. The tissue scatters some light, which leads to loss of light and image blur. The inverted retina has, therefore, long been regarded as inferior. Here, we provide evidence that the inverted retina actually is a superior space-saving solution, especially in small eyes. The inverted retina has most likely facilitated the... (More)
Vertebrate eyes are of the simple or camera type with a single optical system that creates an image on the retina in the back of the eye. There, the visual information is encoded as nervous signals by photoreceptors, processed by retinal neurons, and then sent to the brain via the optic nerve. Surprisingly at first sight, the retinal neurons are located between the lens and the light-sensitive parts of the photoreceptors. The tissue scatters some light, which leads to loss of light and image blur. The inverted retina has, therefore, long been regarded as inferior. Here, we provide evidence that the inverted retina actually is a superior space-saving solution, especially in small eyes. The inverted retina has most likely facilitated the evolution of image-forming eyes in vertebrates, and it still benefits especially small and highly visual species. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Vision Research
volume
49
issue
18
pages
2318 - 2321
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000269512900008
  • scopus:68649114145
ISSN
1878-5646
DOI
10.1016/j.visres.2009.07.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8a7a9d79-b953-4cd8-922a-165b580eec21 (old id 1453172)
date added to LUP
2009-09-01 09:27:43
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:23:53
@article{8a7a9d79-b953-4cd8-922a-165b580eec21,
  abstract     = {Vertebrate eyes are of the simple or camera type with a single optical system that creates an image on the retina in the back of the eye. There, the visual information is encoded as nervous signals by photoreceptors, processed by retinal neurons, and then sent to the brain via the optic nerve. Surprisingly at first sight, the retinal neurons are located between the lens and the light-sensitive parts of the photoreceptors. The tissue scatters some light, which leads to loss of light and image blur. The inverted retina has, therefore, long been regarded as inferior. Here, we provide evidence that the inverted retina actually is a superior space-saving solution, especially in small eyes. The inverted retina has most likely facilitated the evolution of image-forming eyes in vertebrates, and it still benefits especially small and highly visual species.},
  author       = {Kröger, Ronald and Biehlmaier, Oliver},
  issn         = {1878-5646},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {18},
  pages        = {2318--2321},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Vision Research},
  title        = {Space-saving advantage of an inverted retina.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2009.07.001},
  volume       = {49},
  year         = {2009},
}