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Microsatellite diversity predicts recruitment of sibling great reed warblers

Hansson, Bengt LU ; Bensch, Staffan LU ; Hasselquist, Dennis LU and Åkesson, Mikael LU (2001) In Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences 268(1473). p.1287-1291
Abstract
Inbreeding increases the level of homozygosity, which in turn might depress fitness. In addition, individuals having the same inbreeding coefficient (e.g. siblings) vary in homozygosity. The potential fitness effects of variation in homozygosity that is unrelated to the inbreeding coefficient have seldom been examined. Here, we present evidence from wild birds that genetic variation at five microsatellite loci predicts the recruitment success of siblings. Dyads of full-sibling great reed warblers (Acrocephalus arundinaceus), one individual of which became a recruit to the natal population while the other did not return, were selected for the analysis. Each dyad was matched for sex and size. Local recruitment is strongly lied to fitness in... (More)
Inbreeding increases the level of homozygosity, which in turn might depress fitness. In addition, individuals having the same inbreeding coefficient (e.g. siblings) vary in homozygosity. The potential fitness effects of variation in homozygosity that is unrelated to the inbreeding coefficient have seldom been examined. Here, we present evidence from wild birds that genetic variation at five microsatellite loci predicts the recruitment success of siblings. Dyads of full-sibling great reed warblers (Acrocephalus arundinaceus), one individual of which became a recruit to the natal population while the other did not return, were selected for the analysis. Each dyad was matched for sex and size. Local recruitment is strongly lied to fitness in great reed warblers as the majority of offspring die before adulthood, philopatry predominates among surviving individuals and emigrants have lower lifetime fitness. Paired tests showed that recruited individuals had higher individual heterozygosity and higher genetic diversity, which was measured as the mean squared distance between microsatellite alleles (mean d(2)), than their non-recruited siblings. These relationships suggest that the microsatellite markers, which are generally assumed to be neutral, cosegregated with genes exhibiting genetic variation for fitness. (Less)
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type
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publication status
published
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in
Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences
volume
268
issue
1473
pages
1287 - 1291
publisher
Royal Society Publishing
external identifiers
  • scopus:0035933346
  • pmid:11410156
ISSN
1471-2954
DOI
10.1098/rspb.2001.1640
project
Long-term study of great reed warblers
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
d8166ac3-962c-4d9a-9e91-a5446131b00a (old id 145770)
date added to LUP
2016-04-01 12:16:46
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@article{d8166ac3-962c-4d9a-9e91-a5446131b00a,
  abstract     = {Inbreeding increases the level of homozygosity, which in turn might depress fitness. In addition, individuals having the same inbreeding coefficient (e.g. siblings) vary in homozygosity. The potential fitness effects of variation in homozygosity that is unrelated to the inbreeding coefficient have seldom been examined. Here, we present evidence from wild birds that genetic variation at five microsatellite loci predicts the recruitment success of siblings. Dyads of full-sibling great reed warblers (Acrocephalus arundinaceus), one individual of which became a recruit to the natal population while the other did not return, were selected for the analysis. Each dyad was matched for sex and size. Local recruitment is strongly lied to fitness in great reed warblers as the majority of offspring die before adulthood, philopatry predominates among surviving individuals and emigrants have lower lifetime fitness. Paired tests showed that recruited individuals had higher individual heterozygosity and higher genetic diversity, which was measured as the mean squared distance between microsatellite alleles (mean d(2)), than their non-recruited siblings. These relationships suggest that the microsatellite markers, which are generally assumed to be neutral, cosegregated with genes exhibiting genetic variation for fitness.},
  author       = {Hansson, Bengt and Bensch, Staffan and Hasselquist, Dennis and Åkesson, Mikael},
  issn         = {1471-2954},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1473},
  pages        = {1287--1291},
  publisher    = {Royal Society Publishing},
  series       = {Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences},
  title        = {Microsatellite diversity predicts recruitment of sibling great reed warblers},
  url          = {https://lup.lub.lu.se/search/ws/files/2857684/625064.pdf},
  doi          = {10.1098/rspb.2001.1640},
  volume       = {268},
  year         = {2001},
}