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Partial albinism in a semi-isolated population of great reed warblers

Bensch, Staffan LU ; Hansson, Bengt LU ; Hasselquist, Dennis LU and Nielsen, B (2000) In Hereditas 133(2). p.167-170
Abstract
Albinism in birds is thought to result from the expression of recessive alleles that disrupt melanin pigmentation at feather development. We have studied great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus in a recently founded and increasing population in Sweden during 15 years for the presence of birds with albinistic feathers. The study population was founded in 1978 and the few cases of albinism was exclusively recorded during the first five pears of our study (1985-1989). This fits to the expected pattern if albinism is governed by recessive alleles; we have previously demonstrated that the population suffered from inbreeding during the first years of our study. The albinistic birds experienced a similar lifetime reproductive success as... (More)
Albinism in birds is thought to result from the expression of recessive alleles that disrupt melanin pigmentation at feather development. We have studied great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus in a recently founded and increasing population in Sweden during 15 years for the presence of birds with albinistic feathers. The study population was founded in 1978 and the few cases of albinism was exclusively recorded during the first five pears of our study (1985-1989). This fits to the expected pattern if albinism is governed by recessive alleles; we have previously demonstrated that the population suffered from inbreeding during the first years of our study. The albinistic birds experienced a similar lifetime reproductive success as normally coloured birds. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Hereditas
volume
133
issue
2
pages
167 - 170
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:0034457277
ISSN
1601-5223
DOI
10.1111/j.1601-5223.2000.t01-1-00167.x
project
Wild great reed warblers
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
76cd83d0-48f1-4779-a7af-001743cfad94 (old id 145823)
alternative location
http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/toc/HRD/133/2
date added to LUP
2007-06-21 15:32:03
date last changed
2017-10-22 03:33:49
@article{76cd83d0-48f1-4779-a7af-001743cfad94,
  abstract     = {Albinism in birds is thought to result from the expression of recessive alleles that disrupt melanin pigmentation at feather development. We have studied great reed warblers Acrocephalus arundinaceus in a recently founded and increasing population in Sweden during 15 years for the presence of birds with albinistic feathers. The study population was founded in 1978 and the few cases of albinism was exclusively recorded during the first five pears of our study (1985-1989). This fits to the expected pattern if albinism is governed by recessive alleles; we have previously demonstrated that the population suffered from inbreeding during the first years of our study. The albinistic birds experienced a similar lifetime reproductive success as normally coloured birds.},
  author       = {Bensch, Staffan and Hansson, Bengt and Hasselquist, Dennis and Nielsen, B},
  issn         = {1601-5223},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {167--170},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Hereditas},
  title        = {Partial albinism in a semi-isolated population of great reed warblers},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1601-5223.2000.t01-1-00167.x},
  volume       = {133},
  year         = {2000},
}