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Religious feminisation, confessionalism, and re-masculinisation in western European society, 1800-1960

Werner, Yvonne Maria LU (2009) In Pieties and gender International studies in religion and society, 9. p.143-166
Abstract
In my article, I am discussing two main concepts of special interest when studying gender and religion in modern Western society, namely the theory of a feminisation of Christianity in the 19th century and the concept of a reconfessionalisation of European society. The previous concept is developed on the basis of studies on liberal-bourgeois milieus, where a belief in science and social progress gradually replaced Christianity as a normative guideline. Religion was regarded a private matter pertaining to women, and therefore of no or little relevance in the men’s world. The discursive feminisation of Christianity progressed in step with the division into private and public that characterised the rising liberal-bourgeois society. The... (More)
In my article, I am discussing two main concepts of special interest when studying gender and religion in modern Western society, namely the theory of a feminisation of Christianity in the 19th century and the concept of a reconfessionalisation of European society. The previous concept is developed on the basis of studies on liberal-bourgeois milieus, where a belief in science and social progress gradually replaced Christianity as a normative guideline. Religion was regarded a private matter pertaining to women, and therefore of no or little relevance in the men’s world. The discursive feminisation of Christianity progressed in step with the division into private and public that characterised the rising liberal-bourgeois society. The concept of a re-confessionalisation of society takes another part of departure. A starting point is the revivalist movement and the revitalisation of the churches in 19th century Western society. Whereas the feminisation thesis implies that men distanced themselves from church life, the concept of confessionalisation homes in on those parts of society that were dominated by men. Confessionalisation here becomes a key to understanding male engagement in the church in an otherwise increasingly feminised religious context. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
feminisation, modern Western society, national identity, Gender, religion, confessionalisation
in
Pieties and gender
editor
Lene, Sjørup; Hilda, Rømer Christensen; and
volume
International studies in religion and society, 9
pages
143 - 166
publisher
Brill Academic Publishers
external identifiers
  • scopus:84966649952
ISSN
1573-4293
ISBN
9789004178267
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
a204bc1f-3ef5-402d-b505-c1099df00093 (old id 1459189)
date added to LUP
2009-08-24 15:19:24
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:33:34
@inbook{a204bc1f-3ef5-402d-b505-c1099df00093,
  abstract     = {In my article, I am discussing two main concepts of special interest when studying gender and religion in modern Western society, namely the theory of a feminisation of Christianity in the 19th century and the concept of a reconfessionalisation of European society. The previous concept is developed on the basis of studies on liberal-bourgeois milieus, where a belief in science and social progress gradually replaced Christianity as a normative guideline. Religion was regarded a private matter pertaining to women, and therefore of no or little relevance in the men’s world. The discursive feminisation of Christianity progressed in step with the division into private and public that characterised the rising liberal-bourgeois society. The concept of a re-confessionalisation of society takes another part of departure. A starting point is the revivalist movement and the revitalisation of the churches in 19th century Western society. Whereas the feminisation thesis implies that men distanced themselves from church life, the concept of confessionalisation homes in on those parts of society that were dominated by men. Confessionalisation here becomes a key to understanding male engagement in the church in an otherwise increasingly feminised religious context.},
  author       = {Werner, Yvonne Maria},
  editor       = {Lene, Sjørup and Hilda, Rømer Christensen},
  isbn         = {9789004178267},
  issn         = {1573-4293},
  keyword      = {feminisation,modern Western society,national identity,Gender,religion,confessionalisation},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {143--166},
  publisher    = {Brill Academic Publishers},
  series       = {Pieties and gender},
  title        = {Religious feminisation, confessionalism, and re-masculinisation in western European society, 1800-1960},
  volume       = {International studies in religion and society, 9},
  year         = {2009},
}