Advanced

Mother's Genome or Maternally-Inherited Genes Acting in the Fetus Influence Gestational Age in Familial Preterm Birth

Plunkett, Jevon; Feitosa, Mary F.; Trusgnich, Michelle; Wangler, Michael F.; Palomar, Lisanne; Kistka, Zachary A. -F.; DeFranco, Emily A.; Shen, Tammy T.; Stormo, Adrienne E. D. and Puttonen, Hilkka, et al. (2009) In Human Heredity 68(3). p.209-219
Abstract
Objective: While multiple lines of evidence suggest the importance of genetic contributors to risk of preterm birth, the nature of the genetic component has not been identified. We perform segregation analyses to identify the best fitting genetic model for gestational age, a quantitative proxy for preterm birth. Methods: Because either mother or infant can be considered the proband from a preterm delivery and there is evidence to suggest that genetic factors in either one or both may influence the trait, we performed segregation analysis for gestational age either attributed to the infant (infant's gestational age), or the mother (by averaging the gestational ages at which her children were delivered), using 96 multiplex preterm families.... (More)
Objective: While multiple lines of evidence suggest the importance of genetic contributors to risk of preterm birth, the nature of the genetic component has not been identified. We perform segregation analyses to identify the best fitting genetic model for gestational age, a quantitative proxy for preterm birth. Methods: Because either mother or infant can be considered the proband from a preterm delivery and there is evidence to suggest that genetic factors in either one or both may influence the trait, we performed segregation analysis for gestational age either attributed to the infant (infant's gestational age), or the mother (by averaging the gestational ages at which her children were delivered), using 96 multiplex preterm families. Results: These data lend further support to a genetic component contributing to birth timing since sporadic (i.e. no familial resemblance) and nontransmission (i.e. environmental factors alone contribute to gestational age) models are strongly rejected. Analyses of gestational age attributed to the infant support a model in which mother's genome and/or maternally-inherited genes acting in the fetus are largely responsible for birth timing, with a smaller contribution from the paternally-inherited alleles in the fetal genome. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that genetic influences on birth timing are important and likely complex. Copyright (C) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
, et al. (More)
(Less)
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Imprinting, Maternal effects, Segregation analysis, Preterm birth, Gestational age, Genetic model
in
Human Heredity
volume
68
issue
3
pages
209 - 219
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000267841300006
  • scopus:66749088669
ISSN
1423-0062
DOI
10.1159/000224641
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8d0338b1-a706-443a-9628-cccecfb2f3de (old id 1462565)
date added to LUP
2009-08-31 11:02:34
date last changed
2017-10-01 03:42:07
@article{8d0338b1-a706-443a-9628-cccecfb2f3de,
  abstract     = {Objective: While multiple lines of evidence suggest the importance of genetic contributors to risk of preterm birth, the nature of the genetic component has not been identified. We perform segregation analyses to identify the best fitting genetic model for gestational age, a quantitative proxy for preterm birth. Methods: Because either mother or infant can be considered the proband from a preterm delivery and there is evidence to suggest that genetic factors in either one or both may influence the trait, we performed segregation analysis for gestational age either attributed to the infant (infant's gestational age), or the mother (by averaging the gestational ages at which her children were delivered), using 96 multiplex preterm families. Results: These data lend further support to a genetic component contributing to birth timing since sporadic (i.e. no familial resemblance) and nontransmission (i.e. environmental factors alone contribute to gestational age) models are strongly rejected. Analyses of gestational age attributed to the infant support a model in which mother's genome and/or maternally-inherited genes acting in the fetus are largely responsible for birth timing, with a smaller contribution from the paternally-inherited alleles in the fetal genome. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that genetic influences on birth timing are important and likely complex. Copyright (C) 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel},
  author       = {Plunkett, Jevon and Feitosa, Mary F. and Trusgnich, Michelle and Wangler, Michael F. and Palomar, Lisanne and Kistka, Zachary A. -F. and DeFranco, Emily A. and Shen, Tammy T. and Stormo, Adrienne E. D. and Puttonen, Hilkka and Hallman, Mikko and Haataja, Ritva and Luukkonen, Aino and Fellman, Vineta and Peltonen, Leena and Palotie, Aarno and Daw, E. Warwick and An, Ping and Teramo, Kari and Borecki, Ingrid and Muglia, Louis J.},
  issn         = {1423-0062},
  keyword      = {Imprinting,Maternal effects,Segregation analysis,Preterm birth,Gestational age,Genetic model},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {209--219},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Human Heredity},
  title        = {Mother's Genome or Maternally-Inherited Genes Acting in the Fetus Influence Gestational Age in Familial Preterm Birth},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000224641},
  volume       = {68},
  year         = {2009},
}