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Low-Grade Chronic Inflammation in the Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease (RISC) Population Associations with insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk profile

de Rooij, Susanne R.; Nijpels, Giel; Nilsson, Peter LU ; Nolan, John J.; Gabriel, Rafael; Bobbioni-Harsch, Elisabetta; Mingrone, Geltrude and Dekker, Jacqueline M. (2009) In Diabetes Care 32(7). p.1295-1301
Abstract
OBJECTIVE - Low-grade chronic inflammation has been hypothesized to underlie the constellation of cardiometabolic risk factors, possibly by inducing insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated associations between inflammation markers, insulin sensitivity (expressed as the ratio of the M value to the mean plasma insulin concentrations measured during the Final 40 min of the clamp [M/I]), and a range of cardiometabolic risk factors in a large, healthy population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - The Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease (RISC) cohort includes 1,326 nondiabetic European men and women, aged between 30 and 60 years. We measured cardiometabolic risk factors and performed a... (More)
OBJECTIVE - Low-grade chronic inflammation has been hypothesized to underlie the constellation of cardiometabolic risk factors, possibly by inducing insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated associations between inflammation markers, insulin sensitivity (expressed as the ratio of the M value to the mean plasma insulin concentrations measured during the Final 40 min of the clamp [M/I]), and a range of cardiometabolic risk factors in a large, healthy population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - The Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease (RISC) cohort includes 1,326 nondiabetic European men and women, aged between 30 and 60 years. We measured cardiometabolic risk factors and performed a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. We determined total white blood cell count (WBC) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as markers of chronic inflammation. RESULTS - WBC and ESR were both Strongly associated with M/I. WBC and ESR were further associated with a range of cardiometabolic risk factors. Associations between WBC and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, heart rate, fasting C-peptide, and insulin and 2-h insulin in men and women and between WBC and 2-h glucose in women remained significant after adjustment for both M/I and waist circumference. Associations between ESR and HDL cholesterol, heart rate, fasting, and 2-h insulin in men and women and between ESR and fat mass in women remained significant after adjustment for M/I and waist circumference. CONCLUSIONS - This study showed that low-grade chronic inflammation is associated with the cardiometabolic risk profile of a healthy population. Insulin resistance, although Strongly associated with inflammation, does not seem to play a large intermediary role. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Diabetes Care
volume
32
issue
7
pages
1295 - 1301
publisher
American Diabetes Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000267878300034
  • scopus:67650084728
ISSN
1935-5548
DOI
10.2337/dc08-1795
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
adf2cc2b-8bc0-4ae7-992f-c65c66ad8f6b (old id 1462772)
date added to LUP
2009-08-31 10:42:54
date last changed
2017-12-10 04:09:33
@article{adf2cc2b-8bc0-4ae7-992f-c65c66ad8f6b,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE - Low-grade chronic inflammation has been hypothesized to underlie the constellation of cardiometabolic risk factors, possibly by inducing insulin resistance. In the present study, we investigated associations between inflammation markers, insulin sensitivity (expressed as the ratio of the M value to the mean plasma insulin concentrations measured during the Final 40 min of the clamp [M/I]), and a range of cardiometabolic risk factors in a large, healthy population. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS - The Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease (RISC) cohort includes 1,326 nondiabetic European men and women, aged between 30 and 60 years. We measured cardiometabolic risk factors and performed a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. We determined total white blood cell count (WBC) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) as markers of chronic inflammation. RESULTS - WBC and ESR were both Strongly associated with M/I. WBC and ESR were further associated with a range of cardiometabolic risk factors. Associations between WBC and HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, heart rate, fasting C-peptide, and insulin and 2-h insulin in men and women and between WBC and 2-h glucose in women remained significant after adjustment for both M/I and waist circumference. Associations between ESR and HDL cholesterol, heart rate, fasting, and 2-h insulin in men and women and between ESR and fat mass in women remained significant after adjustment for M/I and waist circumference. CONCLUSIONS - This study showed that low-grade chronic inflammation is associated with the cardiometabolic risk profile of a healthy population. Insulin resistance, although Strongly associated with inflammation, does not seem to play a large intermediary role.},
  author       = {de Rooij, Susanne R. and Nijpels, Giel and Nilsson, Peter and Nolan, John J. and Gabriel, Rafael and Bobbioni-Harsch, Elisabetta and Mingrone, Geltrude and Dekker, Jacqueline M.},
  issn         = {1935-5548},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1295--1301},
  publisher    = {American Diabetes Association},
  series       = {Diabetes Care},
  title        = {Low-Grade Chronic Inflammation in the Relationship between Insulin Sensitivity and Cardiovascular Disease (RISC) Population Associations with insulin resistance and cardiometabolic risk profile},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2337/dc08-1795},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2009},
}