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Pressure distribution in mammography: compression of breasts with malignant tumor masses

Förnvik, Daniel LU ; Dustler, Magnus LU ; Andersson, Ingvar LU ; Brorson, Håkan LU ; Timberg, Pontus LU ; Zackrisson, Sophia LU and Tingberg, Anders LU (2013) Conference on Medical Imaging - Physics of Medical Imaging, 2013 8668. p.86684-86684
Abstract
The pressure distribution over a compressed breast is in general heterogeneous. In this study we investigated the pressure distribution over compressed breasts with tumor masses. Twenty-two women either recalled for work-up of findings suspicious for breast cancer in the screening program or with clinically suspected findings were included in the study. Twenty-one lesions turned out to be malignant and one benign. The distribution of compression pressure was measured using thin FSR (Force Sensing Resistor) pressure sensors attached to the compression plate. The pressure over the breast was ascertained by acquiring an x-ray image of the compressed breast with the pressure sensors present. The pressure data and the mammogram were used to... (More)
The pressure distribution over a compressed breast is in general heterogeneous. In this study we investigated the pressure distribution over compressed breasts with tumor masses. Twenty-two women either recalled for work-up of findings suspicious for breast cancer in the screening program or with clinically suspected findings were included in the study. Twenty-one lesions turned out to be malignant and one benign. The distribution of compression pressure was measured using thin FSR (Force Sensing Resistor) pressure sensors attached to the compression plate. The pressure over the breast was ascertained by acquiring an x-ray image of the compressed breast with the pressure sensors present. The pressure data and the mammogram were used to create a composite image with pressure data displayed as a color overlay. The malignant tumor area generally matched an elevated pressure area and this pressure was generally higher than the pressure over surrounding parenchyma. In 11 out of 22 (50%) subjects the maximum pressure over the breast was located over the tumor. Only 4 out of 22 (18%) masses had a lower tumor mean pressure compared to the mean pressure over the breast (including one small < 10 mm tumor and one benign structure). The results suggest that tumors are stiffer, thus, absorbing more pressure compared to the surrounding parenchyma and that this property can be quantified. Refined pressure techniques could possibly be used to demonstrate the relative elasticity distribution in breast tissue, which might provide valuable differential diagnostic information. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceeding
publication status
published
subject
keywords
breast compression, mammography, pressure distribution, mechanical, imaging, elastic stiffness, stress/strain
host publication
Medical Imaging 2013: Physics of Medical Imaging
volume
8668
pages
86684 - 86684
publisher
SPIE
conference name
Conference on Medical Imaging - Physics of Medical Imaging, 2013
conference location
Lake Buena Vista, FL, United States
conference dates
2013-02-11 - 2013-02-14
external identifiers
  • wos:000322002700149
  • scopus:84878342837
ISSN
0277-786X
1996-756X
DOI
10.1117/12.2007570
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
14646db2-e7af-4ef3-92a5-33b04dbec83e (old id 4027048)
date added to LUP
2013-10-08 09:48:34
date last changed
2019-09-11 01:20:52
@inproceedings{14646db2-e7af-4ef3-92a5-33b04dbec83e,
  abstract     = {The pressure distribution over a compressed breast is in general heterogeneous. In this study we investigated the pressure distribution over compressed breasts with tumor masses. Twenty-two women either recalled for work-up of findings suspicious for breast cancer in the screening program or with clinically suspected findings were included in the study. Twenty-one lesions turned out to be malignant and one benign. The distribution of compression pressure was measured using thin FSR (Force Sensing Resistor) pressure sensors attached to the compression plate. The pressure over the breast was ascertained by acquiring an x-ray image of the compressed breast with the pressure sensors present. The pressure data and the mammogram were used to create a composite image with pressure data displayed as a color overlay. The malignant tumor area generally matched an elevated pressure area and this pressure was generally higher than the pressure over surrounding parenchyma. In 11 out of 22 (50%) subjects the maximum pressure over the breast was located over the tumor. Only 4 out of 22 (18%) masses had a lower tumor mean pressure compared to the mean pressure over the breast (including one small &lt; 10 mm tumor and one benign structure). The results suggest that tumors are stiffer, thus, absorbing more pressure compared to the surrounding parenchyma and that this property can be quantified. Refined pressure techniques could possibly be used to demonstrate the relative elasticity distribution in breast tissue, which might provide valuable differential diagnostic information.},
  author       = {Förnvik, Daniel and Dustler, Magnus and Andersson, Ingvar and Brorson, Håkan and Timberg, Pontus and Zackrisson, Sophia and Tingberg, Anders},
  issn         = {0277-786X},
  keyword      = {breast compression,mammography,pressure distribution,mechanical,imaging,elastic stiffness,stress/strain},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Lake Buena Vista, FL, United States},
  pages        = {86684--86684},
  publisher    = {SPIE},
  title        = {Pressure distribution in mammography: compression of breasts with malignant tumor masses},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/12.2007570},
  volume       = {8668},
  year         = {2013},
}