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What tangled web: barriers to rampant horizontal gene transfer

Kurland, Charles LU (2005) In BioEssays 27(7). p.741-747
Abstract
Dawkins in his The Selfish Gene(1) quite aptly applies the term "selfish" to parasitic repetitive DNA sequences endemic to eukaryotic genomes, especially vertebrates. Doolittle and Sapienza (2) as well as Orgel and Crick (3) enlivened this notion of selfish DNA with the identification of such repetitive sequences as remnants of mobile elements such as transposons. In addition, Orgel and Crick (3) associated parasitic DNA with a potential to outgrow their host genomes by propagating both vertically via conventional genome replication as well as infectiously by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) to other genomes. Still later, Doolittle (4) speculated that unchecked HGT between unrelated genomes so complicates phylogeny that the conventional... (More)
Dawkins in his The Selfish Gene(1) quite aptly applies the term "selfish" to parasitic repetitive DNA sequences endemic to eukaryotic genomes, especially vertebrates. Doolittle and Sapienza (2) as well as Orgel and Crick (3) enlivened this notion of selfish DNA with the identification of such repetitive sequences as remnants of mobile elements such as transposons. In addition, Orgel and Crick (3) associated parasitic DNA with a potential to outgrow their host genomes by propagating both vertically via conventional genome replication as well as infectiously by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) to other genomes. Still later, Doolittle (4) speculated that unchecked HGT between unrelated genomes so complicates phylogeny that the conventional representation of a tree of life would have to be replaced by a thicket or a web of life. (4) In contrast, considerable data now show that reconstructions based on whole genome sequences are consistent with the conventional "tree of life".((5-10)) Here, we identify natural barriers that protect modern genome populations from the inroads of rampant HGT. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
BioEssays
volume
27
issue
7
pages
741 - 747
publisher
John Wiley & Sons
external identifiers
  • pmid:15954096
  • wos:000230255200009
  • scopus:23044437168
ISSN
0265-9247
DOI
10.1002/bies.20258
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8ef1d111-b092-46a5-bd7b-52866794bef7 (old id 146787)
date added to LUP
2007-06-29 11:45:43
date last changed
2017-08-13 03:33:39
@article{8ef1d111-b092-46a5-bd7b-52866794bef7,
  abstract     = {Dawkins in his The Selfish Gene(1) quite aptly applies the term "selfish" to parasitic repetitive DNA sequences endemic to eukaryotic genomes, especially vertebrates. Doolittle and Sapienza (2) as well as Orgel and Crick (3) enlivened this notion of selfish DNA with the identification of such repetitive sequences as remnants of mobile elements such as transposons. In addition, Orgel and Crick (3) associated parasitic DNA with a potential to outgrow their host genomes by propagating both vertically via conventional genome replication as well as infectiously by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) to other genomes. Still later, Doolittle (4) speculated that unchecked HGT between unrelated genomes so complicates phylogeny that the conventional representation of a tree of life would have to be replaced by a thicket or a web of life. (4) In contrast, considerable data now show that reconstructions based on whole genome sequences are consistent with the conventional "tree of life".((5-10)) Here, we identify natural barriers that protect modern genome populations from the inroads of rampant HGT. (c) 2005 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.},
  author       = {Kurland, Charles},
  issn         = {0265-9247},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {741--747},
  publisher    = {John Wiley & Sons},
  series       = {BioEssays},
  title        = {What tangled web: barriers to rampant horizontal gene transfer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/bies.20258},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2005},
}