Advanced

Intervention for hazardous alcohol use and high level of stress in university freshmen A comparison between an intervention and a control University.

Andersson, Claes LU ; Johnsson, Kent LU ; Berglund, Mats LU and Öjehagen, Agneta LU (2009) In Brain Research1966-01-01+01:00 Aug 20. p.61-71
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The first year of university studies is associated with increased levels of alcohol drinking and stress. This study examines the one-year outcome of both primary and secondary interventions of one alcohol programme and one stress intervention programme at an intervention university in comparison with a control university. METHODS: At the intervention university all freshmen were offered a primary prevention programme for hazardous alcohol use and stress management and, in addition, those who had high ratings for stress and/or hazardous alcohol use were offered a secondary intervention programme for alcohol consumption and/or stress management. Freshmen still attending the two universities one year later responded to follow-up... (More)
BACKGROUND: The first year of university studies is associated with increased levels of alcohol drinking and stress. This study examines the one-year outcome of both primary and secondary interventions of one alcohol programme and one stress intervention programme at an intervention university in comparison with a control university. METHODS: At the intervention university all freshmen were offered a primary prevention programme for hazardous alcohol use and stress management and, in addition, those who had high ratings for stress and/or hazardous alcohol use were offered a secondary intervention programme for alcohol consumption and/or stress management. Freshmen still attending the two universities one year later responded to follow-up questionnaires. RESULTS: The primary alcohol and stress interventions were associated with lower alcohol expectancies and mental symptoms, but no differences in AUDIT scores (-0.2, CI 95% -0.5 to 0.1), estimated blood alcohol concentrations or stress in comparison to freshmen at the control university. The secondary alcohol interventions were associated with decreased AUDIT (-1.1, CI 95% -2.0 to -0.2) as well as alcohol expectancies, blood alcohol concentrations, stress and mental symptoms in comparison to high-risk freshmen at the control university. The secondary stress interventions were associated with decreased mental symptoms and alcohol expectancies, but not stress, AUDIT scores (-0.6, CI 95% -1.4 to 0.2) and blood alcohol concentrations in comparison to high-risk freshmen at the control university. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that both primary and secondary alcohol and stress interventions have 1-year effects in university freshmen and could be implemented in university settings. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Brain Research1966-01-01+01:00
volume
Aug 20
pages
61 - 71
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000273202100008
  • pmid:19699184
  • scopus:71549171087
ISSN
1872-6240
DOI
10.1016/j.brainres.2009.08.030
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6a31bd2a-8b90-4e2f-a14b-d7598a8a0941 (old id 1469491)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19699184?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-09-07 15:13:12
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:34:52
@article{6a31bd2a-8b90-4e2f-a14b-d7598a8a0941,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: The first year of university studies is associated with increased levels of alcohol drinking and stress. This study examines the one-year outcome of both primary and secondary interventions of one alcohol programme and one stress intervention programme at an intervention university in comparison with a control university. METHODS: At the intervention university all freshmen were offered a primary prevention programme for hazardous alcohol use and stress management and, in addition, those who had high ratings for stress and/or hazardous alcohol use were offered a secondary intervention programme for alcohol consumption and/or stress management. Freshmen still attending the two universities one year later responded to follow-up questionnaires. RESULTS: The primary alcohol and stress interventions were associated with lower alcohol expectancies and mental symptoms, but no differences in AUDIT scores (-0.2, CI 95% -0.5 to 0.1), estimated blood alcohol concentrations or stress in comparison to freshmen at the control university. The secondary alcohol interventions were associated with decreased AUDIT (-1.1, CI 95% -2.0 to -0.2) as well as alcohol expectancies, blood alcohol concentrations, stress and mental symptoms in comparison to high-risk freshmen at the control university. The secondary stress interventions were associated with decreased mental symptoms and alcohol expectancies, but not stress, AUDIT scores (-0.6, CI 95% -1.4 to 0.2) and blood alcohol concentrations in comparison to high-risk freshmen at the control university. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that both primary and secondary alcohol and stress interventions have 1-year effects in university freshmen and could be implemented in university settings.},
  author       = {Andersson, Claes and Johnsson, Kent and Berglund, Mats and Öjehagen, Agneta},
  issn         = {1872-6240},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {61--71},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Brain Research1966-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Intervention for hazardous alcohol use and high level of stress in university freshmen A comparison between an intervention and a control University.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brainres.2009.08.030},
  volume       = {Aug 20},
  year         = {2009},
}