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Different Markers of Alcohol Consumption, Smoking and Body Mass Index in Relation to Risk of Pancreatic Cancer. A Prospective Cohort Study within the Malmö Preventive Project.

Johansen, Dorthe LU ; Borgström, Anders LU ; Lindkvist, Björn LU and Manjer, Jonas LU (2009) In Pancreatology 9(5). p.677-686
Abstract
Background/Aim: The association between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer is not clear. This study investigates different prediagnostic measurements of alcohol consumption, a laboratory marker (gamma-glutamyltransferase; gamma-GT), and a score measuring alcohol addiction (Mm-MAST), in relation to the risk of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the study investigated whether smoking and alcohol consumption interact with each other, or if the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with these factors is modified by obesity or weight gain. Methods: A cohort of 33,346 subjects provided prediagnostic information on the above factors. During a mean follow-up of 22.1 years, 183 cases of pancreatic cancer occurred. Cox's analysis yielded relative... (More)
Background/Aim: The association between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer is not clear. This study investigates different prediagnostic measurements of alcohol consumption, a laboratory marker (gamma-glutamyltransferase; gamma-GT), and a score measuring alcohol addiction (Mm-MAST), in relation to the risk of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the study investigated whether smoking and alcohol consumption interact with each other, or if the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with these factors is modified by obesity or weight gain. Methods: A cohort of 33,346 subjects provided prediagnostic information on the above factors. During a mean follow-up of 22.1 years, 183 cases of pancreatic cancer occurred. Cox's analysis yielded relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: The highest gamma-GT quartile was associated with a high risk of pancreatic cancer (RR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.34-3.44), and this association was even stronger in subjects that reported a previous weight gain (RR = 3.61, 95% CI = 1.29-10.09). A high Mm-MAST score was also associated with pancreatic cancer (p = 0.02). Current smoking was associated with pancreatic cancer (RR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.60-3.43), and obese smokers had an even higher risk (RR = 7.45, 95% CI = 1.65-33.64). Conclusion: High alcohol intake is associated with subsequent risk of pancreatic cancer and this risk may be higher following weight gain. The risk associated with smoking may be even higher in obese subjects. and IAP. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pancreatology
volume
9
issue
5
pages
677 - 686
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000274592500018
  • pmid:19684432
  • scopus:68549136794
ISSN
1424-3903
DOI
10.1159/000212088
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
397e0acd-84c2-453a-ac93-577c1beeaca1 (old id 1469666)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19684432?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-09-07 14:37:44
date last changed
2017-12-17 03:20:32
@article{397e0acd-84c2-453a-ac93-577c1beeaca1,
  abstract     = {Background/Aim: The association between alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer is not clear. This study investigates different prediagnostic measurements of alcohol consumption, a laboratory marker (gamma-glutamyltransferase; gamma-GT), and a score measuring alcohol addiction (Mm-MAST), in relation to the risk of pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, the study investigated whether smoking and alcohol consumption interact with each other, or if the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with these factors is modified by obesity or weight gain. Methods: A cohort of 33,346 subjects provided prediagnostic information on the above factors. During a mean follow-up of 22.1 years, 183 cases of pancreatic cancer occurred. Cox's analysis yielded relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Results: The highest gamma-GT quartile was associated with a high risk of pancreatic cancer (RR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.34-3.44), and this association was even stronger in subjects that reported a previous weight gain (RR = 3.61, 95% CI = 1.29-10.09). A high Mm-MAST score was also associated with pancreatic cancer (p = 0.02). Current smoking was associated with pancreatic cancer (RR = 2.34, 95% CI = 1.60-3.43), and obese smokers had an even higher risk (RR = 7.45, 95% CI = 1.65-33.64). Conclusion: High alcohol intake is associated with subsequent risk of pancreatic cancer and this risk may be higher following weight gain. The risk associated with smoking may be even higher in obese subjects. and IAP.},
  author       = {Johansen, Dorthe and Borgström, Anders and Lindkvist, Björn and Manjer, Jonas},
  issn         = {1424-3903},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {677--686},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Pancreatology},
  title        = {Different Markers of Alcohol Consumption, Smoking and Body Mass Index in Relation to Risk of Pancreatic Cancer. A Prospective Cohort Study within the Malmö Preventive Project.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000212088},
  volume       = {9},
  year         = {2009},
}