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A study of the structure and metal tolerance of the soil microbial community six years after cessation of sewage sludge applications

Witter, E; Gong, P; Bååth, Erland LU and Marstorp, H (2000) In Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 19(8). p.1983-1991
Abstract
Changes in soil microbial community structure and development of metal tolerance as a result of past applications of unamended sewage sludge and metal-amended sewage sludge were found in soils of a long-term field experiment at Braunschweig, Germany. Both the rate of sewage sludge application and metal amendment affected the size and activity of the microbial biomass and had caused changes in microbial community structure as seen by differences in phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Past sewage sludge additions and metal amendment had an effect on the microbial respiratory response to 15 different C substrates, but both the magnitude and the direction of this response were substrate dependent. Differences between the soils in the... (More)
Changes in soil microbial community structure and development of metal tolerance as a result of past applications of unamended sewage sludge and metal-amended sewage sludge were found in soils of a long-term field experiment at Braunschweig, Germany. Both the rate of sewage sludge application and metal amendment affected the size and activity of the microbial biomass and had caused changes in microbial community structure as seen by differences in phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Past sewage sludge additions and metal amendment had an effect on the microbial respiratory response to 15 different C substrates, but both the magnitude and the direction of this response were substrate dependent. Differences between the soils in the respiratory response to the substrates were therefore probably largely determined by differences in the composition of the microbial consortia utilizing the substrates. The level of metal tolerance of the soil bacterial community determined by the thymidine incorporation technique and that of the microbial consortium growing on glucose in situ (determined from respiration measurements) increased with the level of metal contamination of the soil. Metal tolerance measurements could identify the metal with the largest toxicity effect in this experiment with multiple metal-polluted sewage sludge. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
volume
19
issue
8
pages
1983 - 1991
publisher
SETAC and Alliance Communications Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:0033895204
ISSN
0730-7268
DOI
10.1897/1551-5028(2000)019<1983:ASOTSA>2.3.CO;2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8c34aff6-42f3-405e-9274-b4af7e9bef2c (old id 147009)
date added to LUP
2007-07-02 07:40:20
date last changed
2017-06-04 03:34:12
@article{8c34aff6-42f3-405e-9274-b4af7e9bef2c,
  abstract     = {Changes in soil microbial community structure and development of metal tolerance as a result of past applications of unamended sewage sludge and metal-amended sewage sludge were found in soils of a long-term field experiment at Braunschweig, Germany. Both the rate of sewage sludge application and metal amendment affected the size and activity of the microbial biomass and had caused changes in microbial community structure as seen by differences in phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiles. Past sewage sludge additions and metal amendment had an effect on the microbial respiratory response to 15 different C substrates, but both the magnitude and the direction of this response were substrate dependent. Differences between the soils in the respiratory response to the substrates were therefore probably largely determined by differences in the composition of the microbial consortia utilizing the substrates. The level of metal tolerance of the soil bacterial community determined by the thymidine incorporation technique and that of the microbial consortium growing on glucose in situ (determined from respiration measurements) increased with the level of metal contamination of the soil. Metal tolerance measurements could identify the metal with the largest toxicity effect in this experiment with multiple metal-polluted sewage sludge.},
  author       = {Witter, E and Gong, P and Bååth, Erland and Marstorp, H},
  issn         = {0730-7268},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1983--1991},
  publisher    = {SETAC and Alliance Communications Group},
  series       = {Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry},
  title        = {A study of the structure and metal tolerance of the soil microbial community six years after cessation of sewage sludge applications},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1897/1551-5028(2000)019<1983:ASOTSA>2.3.CO;2},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2000},
}