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Flower and cotyledon asymmetry in Brassica cretica: Genetic variation and relationships with fitness

Rao, G Y; Andersson, Stefan LU and Widén, Björn LU (2002) In Evolution 56(4). p.690-698
Abstract
Plants of the partially self-incompatible perennial herb Brassica cretica, derived from contralled cross- and self-pollinations within each of seven populations, were raised under uniform conditions and scored for two measures of developmental stability, flower asymmetry (quantified as the difference in length and width between opposite petals) and cotyledon asymmetry (quantified as the difference in the area of the two lobes of each cotyledon). The primary goals were to assess the level of heritable variation in asymmetry, the effect of selling on mean asymmetry, and the relationship between asymmetry and components of fitness. A paternal half-sibling analysis of data an flower asymmetry failed to detect significant levels of genetic... (More)
Plants of the partially self-incompatible perennial herb Brassica cretica, derived from contralled cross- and self-pollinations within each of seven populations, were raised under uniform conditions and scored for two measures of developmental stability, flower asymmetry (quantified as the difference in length and width between opposite petals) and cotyledon asymmetry (quantified as the difference in the area of the two lobes of each cotyledon). The primary goals were to assess the level of heritable variation in asymmetry, the effect of selling on mean asymmetry, and the relationship between asymmetry and components of fitness. A paternal half-sibling analysis of data an flower asymmetry failed to detect significant levels of genetic variation at the within-population levee, whereas the between-population component reached significance for all measures of asymmetry. Analysis of family-structured data from another crossing experiment revealed significant between-population variation in cotyledon asymmetry and a tendency for inbred progeny to produce more asymmetric cotyledons than outbred progeny. However, the response to inbreeding was weak and differed in magnitude between populations. Judging from the ranking of populations, we found no support for the hypothesis that the mean expression of developmental stability is controlled by genomewide characteristics such as the level of inbreeding. Correlations between measures of asymmetry and fitness were too low to be declared statistically or biologically significant. The present study provides little evidence that flower and cotyledon asymmetry serve as more appropriate predictors of genetic health than conventional (direct) measures of fitness. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Evolution
volume
56
issue
4
pages
690 - 698
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000175614400004
  • pmid:12038527
  • scopus:0035999474
ISSN
1558-5646
DOI
10.1554/0014-3820(2002)056[0690:FACAIB]2.0.CO;2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7ec7a343-480c-4e2d-839b-81d699745098 (old id 147198)
date added to LUP
2007-07-02 13:41:02
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:55:34
@article{7ec7a343-480c-4e2d-839b-81d699745098,
  abstract     = {Plants of the partially self-incompatible perennial herb Brassica cretica, derived from contralled cross- and self-pollinations within each of seven populations, were raised under uniform conditions and scored for two measures of developmental stability, flower asymmetry (quantified as the difference in length and width between opposite petals) and cotyledon asymmetry (quantified as the difference in the area of the two lobes of each cotyledon). The primary goals were to assess the level of heritable variation in asymmetry, the effect of selling on mean asymmetry, and the relationship between asymmetry and components of fitness. A paternal half-sibling analysis of data an flower asymmetry failed to detect significant levels of genetic variation at the within-population levee, whereas the between-population component reached significance for all measures of asymmetry. Analysis of family-structured data from another crossing experiment revealed significant between-population variation in cotyledon asymmetry and a tendency for inbred progeny to produce more asymmetric cotyledons than outbred progeny. However, the response to inbreeding was weak and differed in magnitude between populations. Judging from the ranking of populations, we found no support for the hypothesis that the mean expression of developmental stability is controlled by genomewide characteristics such as the level of inbreeding. Correlations between measures of asymmetry and fitness were too low to be declared statistically or biologically significant. The present study provides little evidence that flower and cotyledon asymmetry serve as more appropriate predictors of genetic health than conventional (direct) measures of fitness.},
  author       = {Rao, G Y and Andersson, Stefan and Widén, Björn},
  issn         = {1558-5646},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {690--698},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Evolution},
  title        = {Flower and cotyledon asymmetry in Brassica cretica: Genetic variation and relationships with fitness},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1554/0014-3820(2002)056[0690:FACAIB]2.0.CO;2},
  volume       = {56},
  year         = {2002},
}