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Does hippocampal size correlate with the degree of caching specialization?

Lucas, J R; Brodin, Anders LU ; de Kort, S R and Clayton, N S (2004) In Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences 271(1556). p.2423-2429
Abstract
A correlation between the degree of specialization for food hoarding and the volume of the hippocampal formation in passerine birds has been accepted for over a decade. The relationship was first demonstrated in family-level comparisons, and subsequently in species comparisons within two families containing a large number of hoarding species, the Corvidae and the Paridae. Recently, this approach has been criticized as invalid and excessively adaptationist. A recent test of the predicted trends with data pooled from previous studies found no evidence for such a correlation in either of these two families. This result has been interpreted as support for the critique. Here we reanalyse the original dataset and also include additional new data... (More)
A correlation between the degree of specialization for food hoarding and the volume of the hippocampal formation in passerine birds has been accepted for over a decade. The relationship was first demonstrated in family-level comparisons, and subsequently in species comparisons within two families containing a large number of hoarding species, the Corvidae and the Paridae. Recently, this approach has been criticized as invalid and excessively adaptationist. A recent test of the predicted trends with data pooled from previous studies found no evidence for such a correlation in either of these two families. This result has been interpreted as support for the critique. Here we reanalyse the original dataset and also include additional new data on several parid species. Our results show a surprising difference between continents, with North American species possessing significantly smaller hippocampi than Eurasian ones. Controlling for the continent effect makes the hoarding capacity/hippocampal formation correlation clearly significant in both families. We discuss possible reasons for the continent effect. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences
volume
271
issue
1556
pages
2423 - 2429
publisher
Royal Society
external identifiers
  • wos:000225973200002
  • pmid:15590591
  • scopus:16644372539
ISSN
1471-2954
DOI
10.1098/rspb.2004.2912
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
4f844f31-9ee3-4e5a-81ac-4098923d841c (old id 147428)
date added to LUP
2007-07-03 13:42:40
date last changed
2017-08-20 03:27:50
@article{4f844f31-9ee3-4e5a-81ac-4098923d841c,
  abstract     = {A correlation between the degree of specialization for food hoarding and the volume of the hippocampal formation in passerine birds has been accepted for over a decade. The relationship was first demonstrated in family-level comparisons, and subsequently in species comparisons within two families containing a large number of hoarding species, the Corvidae and the Paridae. Recently, this approach has been criticized as invalid and excessively adaptationist. A recent test of the predicted trends with data pooled from previous studies found no evidence for such a correlation in either of these two families. This result has been interpreted as support for the critique. Here we reanalyse the original dataset and also include additional new data on several parid species. Our results show a surprising difference between continents, with North American species possessing significantly smaller hippocampi than Eurasian ones. Controlling for the continent effect makes the hoarding capacity/hippocampal formation correlation clearly significant in both families. We discuss possible reasons for the continent effect.},
  author       = {Lucas, J R and Brodin, Anders and de Kort, S R and Clayton, N S},
  issn         = {1471-2954},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1556},
  pages        = {2423--2429},
  publisher    = {Royal Society},
  series       = {Royal Society of London. Proceedings B. Biological Sciences},
  title        = {Does hippocampal size correlate with the degree of caching specialization?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2004.2912},
  volume       = {271},
  year         = {2004},
}