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Population dynamic consequences of delayed life-history effects

Beckerman, A; Benton, TG; Ranta, E; Kaitala, V and Lundberg, Per LU (2002) In Trends in Ecology & Evolution 17(6). p.263-269
Abstract
Evidence from wildlife and human populations indicates that conditions during early development can have marked effects on the subsequent performance of individuals and cohorts. Likewise, the effects of maternal and, more generally, parental environments can be transferred among individuals between generations. These delayed life-history effects are found consistently and suggestions have been made that they can be one source of both variability and of delayed density dependence in population dynamics. Assessments of several different time series indicate that population variability and delayed density dependence are common and that understanding the mechanisms giving rise to them is crucial for the interpretation and application of such... (More)
Evidence from wildlife and human populations indicates that conditions during early development can have marked effects on the subsequent performance of individuals and cohorts. Likewise, the effects of maternal and, more generally, parental environments can be transferred among individuals between generations. These delayed life-history effects are found consistently and suggestions have been made that they can be one source of both variability and of delayed density dependence in population dynamics. Assessments of several different time series indicate that population variability and delayed density dependence are common and that understanding the mechanisms giving rise to them is crucial for the interpretation and application of such models to basic and applied research. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the different ways in which history in the life history might give rise to variability and delayed density dependence in population dynamics. Here, we build on recent appraisals of the pervasive influence of past environmental conditions on current and future fitness and link the details of these life-history studies to classic features of population dynamics. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Trends in Ecology & Evolution
volume
17
issue
6
pages
263 - 269
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000175678500010
  • scopus:0036603925
ISSN
1872-8383
DOI
10.1016/S0169-5347(02)02469-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1fde2773-8e87-4094-bc71-000effc80f83 (old id 147460)
date added to LUP
2007-07-03 10:57:36
date last changed
2017-12-10 03:54:35
@article{1fde2773-8e87-4094-bc71-000effc80f83,
  abstract     = {Evidence from wildlife and human populations indicates that conditions during early development can have marked effects on the subsequent performance of individuals and cohorts. Likewise, the effects of maternal and, more generally, parental environments can be transferred among individuals between generations. These delayed life-history effects are found consistently and suggestions have been made that they can be one source of both variability and of delayed density dependence in population dynamics. Assessments of several different time series indicate that population variability and delayed density dependence are common and that understanding the mechanisms giving rise to them is crucial for the interpretation and application of such models to basic and applied research. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the different ways in which history in the life history might give rise to variability and delayed density dependence in population dynamics. Here, we build on recent appraisals of the pervasive influence of past environmental conditions on current and future fitness and link the details of these life-history studies to classic features of population dynamics.},
  author       = {Beckerman, A and Benton, TG and Ranta, E and Kaitala, V and Lundberg, Per},
  issn         = {1872-8383},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {263--269},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Trends in Ecology & Evolution},
  title        = {Population dynamic consequences of delayed life-history effects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0169-5347(02)02469-2},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2002},
}