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Stem cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease.

Correia, Sofia LU ; Anisimov, Sergey LU ; Li, Jia-Yi LU and Brundin, Patrik LU (2005) In Annals of Medicine 37(7). p.487-498
Abstract
Motor dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease are considered to be primarily due to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Pharmacological therapies based on the principle of dopamine replacement are extremely valuable, but suffer from two main drawbacks: troubling side effects (e.g. dyskinesia) and loss of efficacy with disease progression. Transplantation of embryonic dopaminergic neurons has emerged as a therapeutic alternative. Enthusiasm following the success of the initial open-label trials has been dampened by the negative outcome of double-blind placebo controlled trials. Additionally, the emergence of graft-related dyskinesia indicates that the experimental grafting procedure requires further... (More)
Motor dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease are considered to be primarily due to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Pharmacological therapies based on the principle of dopamine replacement are extremely valuable, but suffer from two main drawbacks: troubling side effects (e.g. dyskinesia) and loss of efficacy with disease progression. Transplantation of embryonic dopaminergic neurons has emerged as a therapeutic alternative. Enthusiasm following the success of the initial open-label trials has been dampened by the negative outcome of double-blind placebo controlled trials. Additionally, the emergence of graft-related dyskinesia indicates that the experimental grafting procedure requires further refinement before it can be developed into a therapy. Shortage of embryonic donor tissue limits large-scale clinical transplantation trials. We review three of the most attractive tissue sources of dopaminergic neurons for cell replacement therapy: human embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue, embryonic and adult multipotent region-specific stem cells and embryonic stem cells. Recent developments in embryonic stem cell research and on their implications for a future transplantation therapy in Parkinson's disease are described. Finally, we discuss how human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into dopaminergic neurons, and issues such as the numbers of dopaminergic neurons required for success and the risk for teratoma formation after implantation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Dopaminergic neurons, neural transplantation, Parkinson's disease, stem cells
in
Annals of Medicine
volume
37
issue
7
pages
487 - 498
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • pmid:16278162
  • wos:000233730800004
  • scopus:28144451899
ISSN
1365-2060
DOI
10.1080/07853890500327967
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ae4f4e08-c5f9-4649-bd06-ee5289e87c4e (old id 148043)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=16278162&dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2007-07-11 12:38:10
date last changed
2017-04-09 03:27:25
@article{ae4f4e08-c5f9-4649-bd06-ee5289e87c4e,
  abstract     = {Motor dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease are considered to be primarily due to the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Pharmacological therapies based on the principle of dopamine replacement are extremely valuable, but suffer from two main drawbacks: troubling side effects (e.g. dyskinesia) and loss of efficacy with disease progression. Transplantation of embryonic dopaminergic neurons has emerged as a therapeutic alternative. Enthusiasm following the success of the initial open-label trials has been dampened by the negative outcome of double-blind placebo controlled trials. Additionally, the emergence of graft-related dyskinesia indicates that the experimental grafting procedure requires further refinement before it can be developed into a therapy. Shortage of embryonic donor tissue limits large-scale clinical transplantation trials. We review three of the most attractive tissue sources of dopaminergic neurons for cell replacement therapy: human embryonic ventral mesencephalic tissue, embryonic and adult multipotent region-specific stem cells and embryonic stem cells. Recent developments in embryonic stem cell research and on their implications for a future transplantation therapy in Parkinson's disease are described. Finally, we discuss how human embryonic stem cells can be differentiated into dopaminergic neurons, and issues such as the numbers of dopaminergic neurons required for success and the risk for teratoma formation after implantation.},
  author       = {Correia, Sofia and Anisimov, Sergey and Li, Jia-Yi and Brundin, Patrik},
  issn         = {1365-2060},
  keyword      = {Dopaminergic neurons,neural transplantation,Parkinson's disease,stem cells},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {487--498},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Annals of Medicine},
  title        = {Stem cell-based therapy for Parkinson's disease.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07853890500327967},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2005},
}