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Evaluation of an Electrically Heated Vest (EHV) Using Thermal Manikin in Cold Environments

Wang, Faming LU and Lee, Hansup (2010) In Annals of Occupational Hygiene 54(1). p.117-124
Abstract
We studied the heating efficiency of an electrically heated vest (EHV), its relationship to the microclimate temperature distribution in a three-layer clothing ensemble and the effect of an EHV on the clothing’s total thermal insulation by both theoretical analysis and thermal manikin measurements. The heat losses at different ambient conditions and heating states were recorded and the heating efficiency of the EHV was calculated. It was found that the EHV can alter the microclimatic temperature distribution of the three-layer clothing ensemble. The EHV can provide an air temperature of 34 ºC around the manikin’s torso skin. The highest temperature on the outside surface of the EHV was about 38 ºC, which indicates that it is safe for the... (More)
We studied the heating efficiency of an electrically heated vest (EHV), its relationship to the microclimate temperature distribution in a three-layer clothing ensemble and the effect of an EHV on the clothing’s total thermal insulation by both theoretical analysis and thermal manikin measurements. The heat losses at different ambient conditions and heating states were recorded and the heating efficiency of the EHV was calculated. It was found that the EHV can alter the microclimatic temperature distribution of the three-layer clothing ensemble. The EHV can provide an air temperature of 34 ºC around the manikin’s torso skin. The highest temperature on the outside surface of the EHV was about 38 ºC, which indicates that it is safe for the consumer. The higher the heating temperature, the lower the heating efficiency obtained. This was due to much more heat being lost to the environment and hence, the heat gain from the EHV was smaller. The heating efficiency decreased from 55.3 % at 0 ºC to 27.4 % at -10 ºC when the heating power was set at 13 watts. We suggest adjusting the heating power to 5 watts (step 1) at an ambient temperature of 0 ºC, while at -10 ºC using 13 watts (step 3) to provide the consumer a thermal comfort condition. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
heating efficiency, electrically heated vest (EHV), cold environment, microclimate temperature, thermal manikin
in
Annals of Occupational Hygiene
volume
54
issue
1
pages
117 - 124
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:19901001
  • wos:000273492400012
  • scopus:77249135141
ISSN
1475-3162
DOI
10.1093/annhyg/mep073
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2d51e2d3-0807-4ebf-b5ef-594f3fa8d99b (old id 1483084)
date added to LUP
2010-01-12 08:34:24
date last changed
2018-05-29 09:41:29
@article{2d51e2d3-0807-4ebf-b5ef-594f3fa8d99b,
  abstract     = {We studied the heating efficiency of an electrically heated vest (EHV), its relationship to the microclimate temperature distribution in a three-layer clothing ensemble and the effect of an EHV on the clothing’s total thermal insulation by both theoretical analysis and thermal manikin measurements. The heat losses at different ambient conditions and heating states were recorded and the heating efficiency of the EHV was calculated. It was found that the EHV can alter the microclimatic temperature distribution of the three-layer clothing ensemble. The EHV can provide an air temperature of 34 ºC around the manikin’s torso skin. The highest temperature on the outside surface of the EHV was about 38 ºC, which indicates that it is safe for the consumer. The higher the heating temperature, the lower the heating efficiency obtained. This was due to much more heat being lost to the environment and hence, the heat gain from the EHV was smaller. The heating efficiency decreased from 55.3 % at 0 ºC to 27.4 % at -10 ºC when the heating power was set at 13 watts. We suggest adjusting the heating power to 5 watts (step 1) at an ambient temperature of 0 ºC, while at -10 ºC using 13 watts (step 3) to provide the consumer a thermal comfort condition.},
  author       = {Wang, Faming and Lee, Hansup},
  issn         = {1475-3162},
  keyword      = {heating efficiency,electrically heated vest (EHV),cold environment,microclimate temperature,thermal manikin},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {117--124},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Annals of Occupational Hygiene},
  title        = {Evaluation of an Electrically Heated Vest (EHV) Using Thermal Manikin in Cold Environments},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/annhyg/mep073},
  volume       = {54},
  year         = {2010},
}