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Gelatin-fibrinogen cryogel dermal matrices for wound repair: Preparation, optimisation and in vitro study.

Dainiak, Maria B; Allan, Iain U; Savina, Irina N; Cornelio, Lisa; James, Elizabeth S; James, Stuart L; Mikhalovsky, Sergey V; Jungvid, Hans and Galaev, Igor LU (2010) In Biomaterials 31. p.67-76
Abstract
Macroporous sponge-like gelatin-fibrinogen (Gl-Fg) scaffolds cross-linked with different concentrations (0.05-0.5%) of glutaraldehyde (GA) were produced using cryogelation technology, which allows for the preparation of highly porous scaffolds without compromising their mechanical properties, and is a more cost-efficient process than freeze-drying. The produced Gl-Fg-GA(X) scaffolds had a uniform interconnected open porous structure with a porosity of up to 90-92% and a pore size distribution of 10-120mum. All of the obtained cryogels were elastic and mechanically stable, except for the Gl-Fg-GA(0.05) scaffolds. Swelling kinetics and degradation rate, but not the porous structure of the cryogels, were strongly dependent on the degree of... (More)
Macroporous sponge-like gelatin-fibrinogen (Gl-Fg) scaffolds cross-linked with different concentrations (0.05-0.5%) of glutaraldehyde (GA) were produced using cryogelation technology, which allows for the preparation of highly porous scaffolds without compromising their mechanical properties, and is a more cost-efficient process than freeze-drying. The produced Gl-Fg-GA(X) scaffolds had a uniform interconnected open porous structure with a porosity of up to 90-92% and a pore size distribution of 10-120mum. All of the obtained cryogels were elastic and mechanically stable, except for the Gl-Fg-GA(0.05) scaffolds. Swelling kinetics and degradation rate, but not the porous structure of the cryogels, were strongly dependent on the degree of cross-linking. A ten-fold increase in the degree of cross-linking resulted in an almost 80-fold decrease in the rate of degradation in a solution of protease. Cryogels were seeded with primary dermal fibroblasts and the densities observed on the surface, plus the expression levels of collagen types I and III observed 5 days post-seeding, were similar to those observed on a control dermal substitute material, Integra((R)). Fibroblast proliferation and migration within the scaffolds were relative to the GA content. Glucose consumption rate was 3-fold higher on Gl-Fg-GA(0.1) than on Gl-Fg-GA(0.5) cryogels 10 days post-seeding. An enhanced cell motility on cryogels with reducing GA crosslinking was obtained after long time culture. Particularly marked cell infiltration was seen in gels using 0.1% GA as a crosslinker. The scaffold started to disintegrate after 42 days of in vitro culturing. The described in vitro studies demonstrated good potential of Gl-Fg-GA(0.1) scaffolds as matrices for wound healing. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Biomaterials
volume
31
pages
67 - 76
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000272364600008
  • pmid:19783036
  • scopus:70350340966
ISSN
1878-5905
DOI
10.1016/j.biomaterials.2009.09.029
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
1e156fdc-669c-4e39-bbff-f56af627219a (old id 1483141)
date added to LUP
2009-10-13 08:49:30
date last changed
2018-06-17 03:36:50
@article{1e156fdc-669c-4e39-bbff-f56af627219a,
  abstract     = {Macroporous sponge-like gelatin-fibrinogen (Gl-Fg) scaffolds cross-linked with different concentrations (0.05-0.5%) of glutaraldehyde (GA) were produced using cryogelation technology, which allows for the preparation of highly porous scaffolds without compromising their mechanical properties, and is a more cost-efficient process than freeze-drying. The produced Gl-Fg-GA(X) scaffolds had a uniform interconnected open porous structure with a porosity of up to 90-92% and a pore size distribution of 10-120mum. All of the obtained cryogels were elastic and mechanically stable, except for the Gl-Fg-GA(0.05) scaffolds. Swelling kinetics and degradation rate, but not the porous structure of the cryogels, were strongly dependent on the degree of cross-linking. A ten-fold increase in the degree of cross-linking resulted in an almost 80-fold decrease in the rate of degradation in a solution of protease. Cryogels were seeded with primary dermal fibroblasts and the densities observed on the surface, plus the expression levels of collagen types I and III observed 5 days post-seeding, were similar to those observed on a control dermal substitute material, Integra((R)). Fibroblast proliferation and migration within the scaffolds were relative to the GA content. Glucose consumption rate was 3-fold higher on Gl-Fg-GA(0.1) than on Gl-Fg-GA(0.5) cryogels 10 days post-seeding. An enhanced cell motility on cryogels with reducing GA crosslinking was obtained after long time culture. Particularly marked cell infiltration was seen in gels using 0.1% GA as a crosslinker. The scaffold started to disintegrate after 42 days of in vitro culturing. The described in vitro studies demonstrated good potential of Gl-Fg-GA(0.1) scaffolds as matrices for wound healing.},
  author       = {Dainiak, Maria B and Allan, Iain U and Savina, Irina N and Cornelio, Lisa and James, Elizabeth S and James, Stuart L and Mikhalovsky, Sergey V and Jungvid, Hans and Galaev, Igor},
  issn         = {1878-5905},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {67--76},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Biomaterials},
  title        = {Gelatin-fibrinogen cryogel dermal matrices for wound repair: Preparation, optimisation and in vitro study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2009.09.029},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2010},
}