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Jurassic volcanism in Skane, southern Sweden, and its relation to coeval regional and global events

Bergelin, Ingemar LU (2009) In GFF 131(1-2). p.165-175
Abstract
Isolated exposures of basalt in a 1000 km 2 area in the central northern part of Skane have long been known to the local people. A volcanic origin for these rocks was finally resolved by geologists during the early 1800s. Until 1965 the volcanic activity was considered to have occurred during the Cenozoic i.e. not older than 65 Ma. In the 1970s attempts were made to directly date the volcanic activity using the K/A radiometric technique. The obtained dates suggested a much older eruption age namely during the Jurassic-Cretaceous. This paper presents Ar-40/Ar-39 geochronological data from eight volcanic necks revealing evidence for two distinct pulses of volcanic activity in this region of Skane. The first and the main volcanic phase... (More)
Isolated exposures of basalt in a 1000 km 2 area in the central northern part of Skane have long been known to the local people. A volcanic origin for these rocks was finally resolved by geologists during the early 1800s. Until 1965 the volcanic activity was considered to have occurred during the Cenozoic i.e. not older than 65 Ma. In the 1970s attempts were made to directly date the volcanic activity using the K/A radiometric technique. The obtained dates suggested a much older eruption age namely during the Jurassic-Cretaceous. This paper presents Ar-40/Ar-39 geochronological data from eight volcanic necks revealing evidence for two distinct pulses of volcanic activity in this region of Skane. The first and the main volcanic phase occurred in the Early Jurassic (late Sinemurian to Toarcian) at 191-178 Ma, some 20-30 million years older than previously reported. The second pulse occurred in the late Early Cretaceous (Albian) at 110 Ma. The similar geochemical composition of the basalts from this region despite the long eruption span of approximately 80 million years and the occurrence of repeated tectonic movements in the region favours the following hypothezised mechanism - intermittent release of eutectic melts caused by tectonic decompression of the lithospheric mantle. Similar processes have been proposed for the coeval North Sea volcanism. On a global scale the tectonic movements in the Earth's crust during the Mesozoic are linked to the break-up of the supercontinent Pangea. Apart from generating volcanic events in Skane and the North Sea more voluminous coeval volcanism occurred in the Karoo and Ferrar volcanic provinces in the Southern Hemisphere. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
rift magmatism, North Sea, Cretaceous, Jurassic, geochronology, Skane, alkaline basalt, Scanian volcanic province
in
GFF
volume
131
issue
1-2
pages
165 - 175
publisher
Geological Society of Sweden
external identifiers
  • wos:000269693400011
  • scopus:75649106899
ISSN
2000-0863
DOI
10.1080/11035890902851278
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
72ae6e7d-ef4f-4250-830a-4aa6fd1df035 (old id 1492368)
date added to LUP
2009-10-16 16:36:28
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:24:15
@article{72ae6e7d-ef4f-4250-830a-4aa6fd1df035,
  abstract     = {Isolated exposures of basalt in a 1000 km 2 area in the central northern part of Skane have long been known to the local people. A volcanic origin for these rocks was finally resolved by geologists during the early 1800s. Until 1965 the volcanic activity was considered to have occurred during the Cenozoic i.e. not older than 65 Ma. In the 1970s attempts were made to directly date the volcanic activity using the K/A radiometric technique. The obtained dates suggested a much older eruption age namely during the Jurassic-Cretaceous. This paper presents Ar-40/Ar-39 geochronological data from eight volcanic necks revealing evidence for two distinct pulses of volcanic activity in this region of Skane. The first and the main volcanic phase occurred in the Early Jurassic (late Sinemurian to Toarcian) at 191-178 Ma, some 20-30 million years older than previously reported. The second pulse occurred in the late Early Cretaceous (Albian) at 110 Ma. The similar geochemical composition of the basalts from this region despite the long eruption span of approximately 80 million years and the occurrence of repeated tectonic movements in the region favours the following hypothezised mechanism - intermittent release of eutectic melts caused by tectonic decompression of the lithospheric mantle. Similar processes have been proposed for the coeval North Sea volcanism. On a global scale the tectonic movements in the Earth's crust during the Mesozoic are linked to the break-up of the supercontinent Pangea. Apart from generating volcanic events in Skane and the North Sea more voluminous coeval volcanism occurred in the Karoo and Ferrar volcanic provinces in the Southern Hemisphere.},
  author       = {Bergelin, Ingemar},
  issn         = {2000-0863},
  keyword      = {rift magmatism,North Sea,Cretaceous,Jurassic,geochronology,Skane,alkaline basalt,Scanian volcanic province},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1-2},
  pages        = {165--175},
  publisher    = {Geological Society of Sweden},
  series       = {GFF},
  title        = {Jurassic volcanism in Skane, southern Sweden, and its relation to coeval regional and global events},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/11035890902851278},
  volume       = {131},
  year         = {2009},
}