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Reducing non-collision injuries in special transportation services by enhanced safety culture

Wretstrand, Anders LU ; Petzäll, Jan; Bylund, Per-Olof and Falkmer, Torbjörn (2010) In Medical Engineering and Physics1994-01-01+01:00 32(3). p.254-262
Abstract
Previous research has pointed out that non-collision injuries occur among wheelchair users in Special Transportation Services (STS - a demand-responsive transport mode). The organization of such modes is also quite complex, involving both stakeholders and key personnel at different levels. Our objective was therefore to qualitatively explore the state of safety, as perceived and discussed within a workplace context. Focus groups were held with drivers of both taxi companies and bus companies. The results indicated that passengers run the risk of being injured without being involved in a vehicle collision. The pertinent organizational and corporate culture did not prioritize safety. The drivers identified some relatively clear-cut safety... (More)
Previous research has pointed out that non-collision injuries occur among wheelchair users in Special Transportation Services (STS - a demand-responsive transport mode). The organization of such modes is also quite complex, involving both stakeholders and key personnel at different levels. Our objective was therefore to qualitatively explore the state of safety, as perceived and discussed within a workplace context. Focus groups were held with drivers of both taxi companies and bus companies. The results indicated that passengers run the risk of being injured without being involved in a vehicle collision. The pertinent organizational and corporate culture did not prioritize safety. The drivers identified some relatively clear-cut safety threats, primarily before and after a ride, at vehicle standstill. The driver's work place seemed to be surrounded with a reactive instead of proactive structure. We conclude that not only vehicle and wheelchair technical safety must be considered in STS, but also system safety. Instead of viewing drivers' error as a cause, it should be seen as a symptom of systems failure. Human error is connected to aspects of tools, tasks, and operating environment. Enhanced understanding and influence of these connections within STS and accessible public transport systems will promote safety for wheelchair users. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Medical Engineering and Physics1994-01-01+01:00
volume
32
issue
3
pages
254 - 262
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000276589400005
  • scopus:77952888018
ISSN
1873-4030
DOI
10.1016/j.medengphy.2009.09.002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
489afb70-e91d-4534-ac15-bdb8df37049e (old id 1494046)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19786361
date added to LUP
2009-10-20 14:36:20
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:31:59
@article{489afb70-e91d-4534-ac15-bdb8df37049e,
  abstract     = {Previous research has pointed out that non-collision injuries occur among wheelchair users in Special Transportation Services (STS - a demand-responsive transport mode). The organization of such modes is also quite complex, involving both stakeholders and key personnel at different levels. Our objective was therefore to qualitatively explore the state of safety, as perceived and discussed within a workplace context. Focus groups were held with drivers of both taxi companies and bus companies. The results indicated that passengers run the risk of being injured without being involved in a vehicle collision. The pertinent organizational and corporate culture did not prioritize safety. The drivers identified some relatively clear-cut safety threats, primarily before and after a ride, at vehicle standstill. The driver's work place seemed to be surrounded with a reactive instead of proactive structure. We conclude that not only vehicle and wheelchair technical safety must be considered in STS, but also system safety. Instead of viewing drivers' error as a cause, it should be seen as a symptom of systems failure. Human error is connected to aspects of tools, tasks, and operating environment. Enhanced understanding and influence of these connections within STS and accessible public transport systems will promote safety for wheelchair users.},
  author       = {Wretstrand, Anders and Petzäll, Jan and Bylund, Per-Olof and Falkmer, Torbjörn},
  issn         = {1873-4030},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {254--262},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Medical Engineering and Physics1994-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Reducing non-collision injuries in special transportation services by enhanced safety culture},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.medengphy.2009.09.002},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2010},
}