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Metabolic response to temperature variation in the great tit: an interpopulation comparison

Broggi, J; Orell, M; Hohtola, E and Nilsson, Jan-Åke LU (2004) In Journal of Animal Ecology 73(5). p.967-972
Abstract
1. We studied the resting metabolic rate (MR) from two great tit Parus major (Linnaeus) populations living in different winter regimes. Birds from the two different localities were exposed individually to +25 °C, 0 °C and −10 °C for the night in three consecutive sessions in random order.



2. Birds from Lund (Sweden) had a lower basal MR, as measured at thermoneutrality (+25 °C), than had birds from Oulu (Finland). Nevertheless, below thermoneutrality, birds from Oulu spent relatively more energy, especially at −10 °C.



3. Although the energy needed for thermoregulation decreased with increasing basal MR this relation is at a higher metabolic cost for birds in Oulu than for birds in Lund.

... (More)
1. We studied the resting metabolic rate (MR) from two great tit Parus major (Linnaeus) populations living in different winter regimes. Birds from the two different localities were exposed individually to +25 °C, 0 °C and −10 °C for the night in three consecutive sessions in random order.



2. Birds from Lund (Sweden) had a lower basal MR, as measured at thermoneutrality (+25 °C), than had birds from Oulu (Finland). Nevertheless, below thermoneutrality, birds from Oulu spent relatively more energy, especially at −10 °C.



3. Although the energy needed for thermoregulation decreased with increasing basal MR this relation is at a higher metabolic cost for birds in Oulu than for birds in Lund.



4. The higher basal MR in Oulu is probably a consequence of a higher maximal MR needed in the severe cold. Further, the observed MRs below thermoneutrality are lower than expected from published data. This suggests that all birds were probably hypothermic at −10 °C, particularly Lund birds, and that the use of controlled hypothermia in great tits may be more common than thought previously. Great tits seem to rely primarily on metabolic adjustment to cope with the harsh climatic conditions in the northernmost parts of its distribution. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Animal Ecology
volume
73
issue
5
pages
967 - 972
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000223375900015
  • scopus:4344713316
ISSN
1365-2656
DOI
10.1111/j.0021-8790.2004.00872.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
8b820acd-1245-4ebd-a99c-d1796e0e8b5d (old id 149600)
date added to LUP
2007-06-25 13:04:24
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:38:59
@article{8b820acd-1245-4ebd-a99c-d1796e0e8b5d,
  abstract     = {1. We studied the resting metabolic rate (MR) from two great tit Parus major (Linnaeus) populations living in different winter regimes. Birds from the two different localities were exposed individually to +25 °C, 0 °C and −10 °C for the night in three consecutive sessions in random order.<br/><br>
 <br/><br>
2. Birds from Lund (Sweden) had a lower basal MR, as measured at thermoneutrality (+25 °C), than had birds from Oulu (Finland). Nevertheless, below thermoneutrality, birds from Oulu spent relatively more energy, especially at −10 °C.<br/><br>
 <br/><br>
3. Although the energy needed for thermoregulation decreased with increasing basal MR this relation is at a higher metabolic cost for birds in Oulu than for birds in Lund.<br/><br>
 <br/><br>
4. The higher basal MR in Oulu is probably a consequence of a higher maximal MR needed in the severe cold. Further, the observed MRs below thermoneutrality are lower than expected from published data. This suggests that all birds were probably hypothermic at −10 °C, particularly Lund birds, and that the use of controlled hypothermia in great tits may be more common than thought previously. Great tits seem to rely primarily on metabolic adjustment to cope with the harsh climatic conditions in the northernmost parts of its distribution.},
  author       = {Broggi, J and Orell, M and Hohtola, E and Nilsson, Jan-Åke},
  issn         = {1365-2656},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {967--972},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Animal Ecology},
  title        = {Metabolic response to temperature variation in the great tit: an interpopulation comparison},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0021-8790.2004.00872.x},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {2004},
}