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Periodontal disease is associated with carotid plaque area : the Malmö Offspring Dental Study (MODS)

Jönsson, D. ; Orho-Melander, M. LU ; Demmer, R. T. ; Engström, G. LU ; Melander, O. LU ; Klinge, B. and Nilsson, P. M. LU (2019) In Journal of Internal Medicine
Abstract

Background: Periodontal disease is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) but it is unknown if periodontal disease severity is associated with asymptomatic carotid plaque. The aim of the current population-based, observational study was to investigate if signs of periodontal disease are associated with the occurrence of carotid plaque and total plaque area (TPA). Methods: The Malmö Offspring Study (MOS) is a population-based study. MOS participants underwent a thorough cardiovascular phenotyping, including carotid ultrasonography. The Malmö Offspring Dental Study (MODS) invited participants of MOS for dental examination, including periodontal charting. Multivariable regression models were used to analyse the presence of carotid... (More)

Background: Periodontal disease is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) but it is unknown if periodontal disease severity is associated with asymptomatic carotid plaque. The aim of the current population-based, observational study was to investigate if signs of periodontal disease are associated with the occurrence of carotid plaque and total plaque area (TPA). Methods: The Malmö Offspring Study (MOS) is a population-based study. MOS participants underwent a thorough cardiovascular phenotyping, including carotid ultrasonography. The Malmö Offspring Dental Study (MODS) invited participants of MOS for dental examination, including periodontal charting. Multivariable regression models were used to analyse the presence of carotid plaque and TPA in relation to periodontal parameters. Results: In all, 831 MODS participants were recruited, out of which 495 belonged to the children generation with mean age of 53 years, 63% had carotid plaque and 38% had moderate or severe periodontal disease. In models adjusted for CVD risk factors, the OR for having carotid plaque in subjects with vs without periodontal disease was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.11–2.78). In a linear model with TPA as dependent and number of periodontal pockets ≥ 4 mm as independent variable, the adjusted beta-coefficient was 0.34 mm2 (95% CI 0.16–0.52). Conclusion: Individuals within the highest quartile of periodontal pockets are expected to have 9 mm2 larger TPA compared to those without pockets. Our results suggest that intervention studies addressing periodontal disease could be useful for prevention of CVD.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
epub
subject
keywords
atherosclerosis, carotid plaque, epidemiology, periodontal disease
in
Journal of Internal Medicine
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • scopus:85075056118
  • pmid:31633250
ISSN
0954-6820
DOI
10.1111/joim.12998
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
14b76e59-f6a5-4458-9d3a-958fbab022bb
date added to LUP
2019-12-03 11:12:39
date last changed
2019-12-04 07:24:38
@article{14b76e59-f6a5-4458-9d3a-958fbab022bb,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Periodontal disease is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) but it is unknown if periodontal disease severity is associated with asymptomatic carotid plaque. The aim of the current population-based, observational study was to investigate if signs of periodontal disease are associated with the occurrence of carotid plaque and total plaque area (TPA). Methods: The Malmö Offspring Study (MOS) is a population-based study. MOS participants underwent a thorough cardiovascular phenotyping, including carotid ultrasonography. The Malmö Offspring Dental Study (MODS) invited participants of MOS for dental examination, including periodontal charting. Multivariable regression models were used to analyse the presence of carotid plaque and TPA in relation to periodontal parameters. Results: In all, 831 MODS participants were recruited, out of which 495 belonged to the children generation with mean age of 53 years, 63% had carotid plaque and 38% had moderate or severe periodontal disease. In models adjusted for CVD risk factors, the OR for having carotid plaque in subjects with vs without periodontal disease was 1.75 (95% CI: 1.11–2.78). In a linear model with TPA as dependent and number of periodontal pockets ≥ 4 mm as independent variable, the adjusted beta-coefficient was 0.34 mm<sup>2</sup> (95% CI 0.16–0.52). Conclusion: Individuals within the highest quartile of periodontal pockets are expected to have 9 mm<sup>2</sup> larger TPA compared to those without pockets. Our results suggest that intervention studies addressing periodontal disease could be useful for prevention of CVD.</p>},
  author       = {Jönsson, D. and Orho-Melander, M. and Demmer, R. T. and Engström, G. and Melander, O. and Klinge, B. and Nilsson, P. M.},
  issn         = {0954-6820},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {10},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Journal of Internal Medicine},
  title        = {Periodontal disease is associated with carotid plaque area : the Malmö Offspring Dental Study (MODS)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/joim.12998},
  doi          = {10.1111/joim.12998},
  year         = {2019},
}