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Detection of warning surfaces in pedestrian environments: The importance for blind people of kerbs, depth, and structure of tactile surfaces.

Ståhl, Agneta LU ; Newman, Emma LU ; Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve LU ; Almén, Mai and Iwarsson, Susanne LU (2010) In Disability and Rehabilitation 32(6). p.469-482
Abstract
Purpose. The overall purpose was to study whether and how persons with blindness detect warning surfaces with a long white cane in a real pedestrian environment after following a natural guidance surface to the warning surfaces. Of particular interest was the importance of kerb, depth, and structure of the warning surfaces. Method. A concurrently mixed methods approach, with a combination of observation using a structured form together with 'think aloud' and a structured interview, was used. It was done with well-defined samples and study sites in an inter-disciplinary research context. Results. The results show that the most important design characteristic for detection of the warning surfaces with a white cane is the structure of the... (More)
Purpose. The overall purpose was to study whether and how persons with blindness detect warning surfaces with a long white cane in a real pedestrian environment after following a natural guidance surface to the warning surfaces. Of particular interest was the importance of kerb, depth, and structure of the warning surfaces. Method. A concurrently mixed methods approach, with a combination of observation using a structured form together with 'think aloud' and a structured interview, was used. It was done with well-defined samples and study sites in an inter-disciplinary research context. Results. The results show that the most important design characteristic for detection of the warning surfaces with a white cane is the structure of the surface, while the depth of the surface and availability of a kerb do not have any impact on the detection. A precondition was that there is a distinct natural guidance surface leading up to the warning surface. Conclusions. The probability among pedestrians with blindness to detect a tactile surface is not higher if the design solution has a kerb. This study also confirms the complexity of being a blind pedestrian in the traffic environment. The results can be used for evidence-based physical planning. The study also has implications for development of more efficient vision rehabilitation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Disability and Rehabilitation
volume
32
issue
6
pages
469 - 482
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000275534200006
  • pmid:19852708
  • scopus:76449096354
ISSN
0963-8288
DOI
10.3109/09638280903171543
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
e8ee7e82-d409-423f-bb91-de7fb424b64a (old id 1500023)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19852708?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-11-04 15:19:43
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:43:24
@article{e8ee7e82-d409-423f-bb91-de7fb424b64a,
  abstract     = {Purpose. The overall purpose was to study whether and how persons with blindness detect warning surfaces with a long white cane in a real pedestrian environment after following a natural guidance surface to the warning surfaces. Of particular interest was the importance of kerb, depth, and structure of the warning surfaces. Method. A concurrently mixed methods approach, with a combination of observation using a structured form together with 'think aloud' and a structured interview, was used. It was done with well-defined samples and study sites in an inter-disciplinary research context. Results. The results show that the most important design characteristic for detection of the warning surfaces with a white cane is the structure of the surface, while the depth of the surface and availability of a kerb do not have any impact on the detection. A precondition was that there is a distinct natural guidance surface leading up to the warning surface. Conclusions. The probability among pedestrians with blindness to detect a tactile surface is not higher if the design solution has a kerb. This study also confirms the complexity of being a blind pedestrian in the traffic environment. The results can be used for evidence-based physical planning. The study also has implications for development of more efficient vision rehabilitation.},
  author       = {Ståhl, Agneta and Newman, Emma and Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve and Almén, Mai and Iwarsson, Susanne},
  issn         = {0963-8288},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {469--482},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Disability and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Detection of warning surfaces in pedestrian environments: The importance for blind people of kerbs, depth, and structure of tactile surfaces.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638280903171543},
  volume       = {32},
  year         = {2010},
}