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Leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events, but not with stroke: A prospective cohort study.

Li, Cairu LU ; Engström, Gunnar LU and Hedblad, Bo LU (2010) In Atherosclerosis 209. p.545-550
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Elevated leukocyte count is a classic marker of systemic inflammation. This study examined whether the leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events (CE) and stroke during a long follow-up period. METHODS: A total of 17,131 men and 2932 women, aged 27-61 years, without history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), were enrolled. Incidence of CE and stroke was studied in relation to leukocyte concentrations over a mean follow-up of 24 years. RESULTS: During the follow-up period, 2600 CE and 1333 stroke events occurred. After risk factor adjustments, leukocyte concentrations in the highest quartile (vs. lowest, >7.0 vs. <4.7x10(9)cells/L) were associated with CE in men (HR: 1.31, 95%CI: 1.16-1.48, trend... (More)
OBJECTIVE: Elevated leukocyte count is a classic marker of systemic inflammation. This study examined whether the leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events (CE) and stroke during a long follow-up period. METHODS: A total of 17,131 men and 2932 women, aged 27-61 years, without history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), were enrolled. Incidence of CE and stroke was studied in relation to leukocyte concentrations over a mean follow-up of 24 years. RESULTS: During the follow-up period, 2600 CE and 1333 stroke events occurred. After risk factor adjustments, leukocyte concentrations in the highest quartile (vs. lowest, >7.0 vs. <4.7x10(9)cells/L) were associated with CE in men (HR: 1.31, 95%CI: 1.16-1.48, trend p<0.001), but not significantly in women (HR: 1.46, CI: 0.87-2.46, trend p=0.13). The increased incidence remained significant after adjustments for plasma fibrinogen in a sub-group of 6018 men (HR: 1.31, CI: 1.08-1.60). The association between leukocytes and CE was most pronounced in younger men (aged 27-46) and men without hypertension. In younger men, high leukocytes were associated with early CE (within 10 years of follow-up) and late CE (>10 years of follow-up). In older men (46-61 years), leukocytes were not associated with CE after more than 10 years of follow-up. The leukocyte count was not associated with incidence of stroke. CONCLUSION: Elevated leukocyte count in men is associated with increased incidence of CE, but not with stroke. The increased risk persisted after more than 10 years of follow-up in younger, but not in older men. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Atherosclerosis
volume
209
pages
545 - 550
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000276158000038
  • pmid:19833340
  • scopus:77950021916
ISSN
1879-1484
DOI
10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2009.09.029
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
fabfbd1a-fc6f-458b-a922-0dd0a98dd8a1 (old id 1500306)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19833340?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2009-11-03 13:31:03
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:00:51
@article{fabfbd1a-fc6f-458b-a922-0dd0a98dd8a1,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVE: Elevated leukocyte count is a classic marker of systemic inflammation. This study examined whether the leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events (CE) and stroke during a long follow-up period. METHODS: A total of 17,131 men and 2932 women, aged 27-61 years, without history of cardiovascular disease (CVD), were enrolled. Incidence of CE and stroke was studied in relation to leukocyte concentrations over a mean follow-up of 24 years. RESULTS: During the follow-up period, 2600 CE and 1333 stroke events occurred. After risk factor adjustments, leukocyte concentrations in the highest quartile (vs. lowest, &gt;7.0 vs. &lt;4.7x10(9)cells/L) were associated with CE in men (HR: 1.31, 95%CI: 1.16-1.48, trend p&lt;0.001), but not significantly in women (HR: 1.46, CI: 0.87-2.46, trend p=0.13). The increased incidence remained significant after adjustments for plasma fibrinogen in a sub-group of 6018 men (HR: 1.31, CI: 1.08-1.60). The association between leukocytes and CE was most pronounced in younger men (aged 27-46) and men without hypertension. In younger men, high leukocytes were associated with early CE (within 10 years of follow-up) and late CE (&gt;10 years of follow-up). In older men (46-61 years), leukocytes were not associated with CE after more than 10 years of follow-up. The leukocyte count was not associated with incidence of stroke. CONCLUSION: Elevated leukocyte count in men is associated with increased incidence of CE, but not with stroke. The increased risk persisted after more than 10 years of follow-up in younger, but not in older men.},
  author       = {Li, Cairu and Engström, Gunnar and Hedblad, Bo},
  issn         = {1879-1484},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {545--550},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Atherosclerosis},
  title        = {Leukocyte count is associated with incidence of coronary events, but not with stroke: A prospective cohort study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2009.09.029},
  volume       = {209},
  year         = {2010},
}